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Seeds and Grains

Seeds and Grains

Our selection of seeds are unsalted with nothing added. Seeds are rich in omega oils and a nutritional power house of vitamins and minerals. A daily serving of seeds is thought to support a healthy heart, a healthy mind and a healthy body. Seeds are mother nature's way of condensing excellent nutrition into a delicious snack.

Our selection of seeds are unsalted with nothing added. Seeds are rich in omega oils and a nutritional power house of vitamins and minerals. A daily serving of seeds is thought to support a healthy heart, a healthy mind and a healthy body.

Seeds are mother nature's way of condensing excellent nutrition into a delicious snack.

Buy Auduki Beans 1kg Organic from Indigo Herbs

Latin Name: Vigna angularis

  • Certified Organic
  • High in Fibre
  • High in Plant Protein
  • Rich in Vitamins & Minerals
  • Resealable Airtight Foil Pouch
  • 100% Pure Botanical Ingredients
£5.99
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

  • Contraindications

Aduki Beans are an organic, dried, high quality bean from Indigo Herbs that also go under the names Adzuki and Azuki bean. The classic English name for this red bean is Red Mung Bean. The Aduki bean is part of the staple diet in East Asia and throughout the Himalayas. Throughout Asia the Aduki is used in all kinds of dishes; sometimes made into pastes and even sweetened with sugar. Aduki beans are very high in protein and minerals and can a great part of varied diet. Why not serve up a dish of highly nutritious Red Bean Rice or Red Bean Soup.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality Wholefoods. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and wellbeing, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals and Superfoods.

Also known as: Aduki Beans, Adzuki Beans, Azuki Beans, Red Mung Bean

These tasty beans are high in many important nutrients that are essential to bone health. Phosphorus, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Copper and Manganese all contribute to building and maintaining bone structure and strength - Iron and Zinc play a crucial role in maintaining the strength and elasticity of bones. With 60% of the body's Magnesium and 80% of Phosphorus stored in the bones, it is very important to get sufficient amounts of these nutrients from natural, organic food. 

Also important for heart health, Black Turtle Bean's Fibre, Folate, Potassium and Vitamin B6 content all support a healthy heart. Vitamin B6 and Folate prevent the build up of a compound called homocysteine. Excessive homocysteine levels can damage blood vessels and lead to heart problems when left unchecked. 

Last but not least, these beans support a healthy digestive system - fibre is well known for its role in digestive health and Vitamin B1 is essential to the breakdown of food into the simpler units of fats, carbohydrates and amino acids, thus supporting metabolism. Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) occupies a central place in energy metabolism, setting the metabolic process of the entire body on the right track making it capable of increasing the stamina of the human body. 

How to Cook:

  • Place dry beans in a bowl covered with several inches of water, and cover with a kitchen towel. Let them sit for 8 hours.
  • Drain water and replace with fresh, cold water for cooking. Place on the cooker and bring to a boil in a pan with a lid. Once boiling, reduce to a simmer, tilting the lid slightly to allow steam to escape, and leave to cook for up to an hour, or until tender.

How To Sprout:

  • After soaking, strain the beans and leave them out in a dish or shallow bowl, somewhere where they will be exposed to air.
  • Keep them slightly damp by adding just a small amount of water to the bowl/dish, but you don’t need them to be covered in water completely. Try adding just 1–2 tablespoons of water.
  • Leave them out for anywhere from 3–4 days.
  • When ready, rinse sprouts well, drain, and store in a jar or container.
  • Keep in the refrigerator for up to 7 days, rinse the sprouted beans every day and put them in a fresh bowl. This is to avoid having any mold or harmful bacteria grow.
HIGH IN
Protein
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High in Protein

Proteins are a group of biological compounds which are present in every live cell, organ and tissue of the body.  Meaning “first” or “of prime importance” in Greek, proteins participate in every cellular process occurring in the body.  Proteins are made up of structures called amino acids, there are a total of 21 amino acids, 9 are essential, the rest are nonessential – you must consume the essential amino acids in your diet because your body cannot make them. 

Dietary protein supports bone health in three main ways: by supplying the raw material required to construct soft bone matrix, by increasing plasma IGF1 and by promoting muscle growth and retention.  IGF1 is a growth hormone that stimulates and increases the activity of osteoblasts (cells which secrete the substance of bone).  It is especially important to ensure that children get enough protein since they are still developing and it is necessary to ensure their growth is unimpaired.  Proteins play an important role in muscle contraction and coordination, they are present in the muscle tissues in the form of many microfilaments and provide muscle structure.  Muscle growth depends on the adequacy of proteins in the body.  Proteins function as building blocks for muscles, bones and cartilage, opt for a variety of whole foods to meet your protein needs including; grass fed meat and poultry, eggs, dairy, seeds, beans and nuts.

Protein contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         a growth in muscle mass

·         the maintenance of muscle mass

·         Protein is needed for normal growth and development of bone in children.

HIGH IN
Dietary Fibre
HIGH IN
Vitamin B1
more info...
High in Vitamin B1

Also known as thiamin, vitamin B1 is one of the eight water soluble vitamins in the vitamin B family.  It is a vital human nutrient playing an important role in how we convert our food into energy – when we consume our food it is broken down into simpler units such as carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, vitamin B1 plays a crucial role in utilising these units to produce energy.  This is especially true for cells in the brain where the energy demand is really high which is why it is also referred to as a “morale vitamin” for its positive effect on the nervous system and a healthy mental attitude! 

Promoting the health of the nervous system, vitamin B1 helps in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress, it is often called the “anti-stress” vitamin and is also reported to improve the memory and powers of concentration.  Thiamin is essential to the body’s cardiac heath, involved in blood formation and helping in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is used to relay messages between the nerves and muscles to ensure proper cardiac function.  Brewer’s yeast and liver are the richest sources of vitamin B1, however, spirulina, linseeds, rye, wheat germ and kidney beans are also important sources of this vitamin.

Vitamin B1 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the normal function of the heart

HIGH IN
Folate
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High in Folate

Folate – the naturally occurring vitamin B9 – is often confused with folic acid.  Folic acid is a synthetically derived molecule created in a German laboratory in the 1940s and does not occur naturally in food.  Needless to say, folate metabolizes faster in the body and any excess is excreted through the urine whereas folic acid can accumulate in the blood and may adversely affect immune cell function.  Nature knows best when it comes to nutrition!  Folate is probably the vitamin whose essential role in pregnancy is most widely known.  It is necessary for the production of new DNA which is needed for the production of new cells – the growing life within the womb engages in constant cell division and the mother must expand her blood supply with the production of new red blood cells – these activities demand a generous supply of folate. 

Folate works to convert the amino acid homocysteine into methionine - a deficiency allows homocysteine levels to accumulate in the body.  High levels of homocysteine are associated with heart disease and stroke and can block blood and other nutrients from reaching the brain, interfering with the production of the feel good hormones serotonin and dopamine which regulate mood.  Within the body, folate is an activator – it has an influence on “natural killer” cells of the immune system which are in charge of fighting infections and malignant cells.  Romaine lettuce, spinach and asparagus are especially high in folate; other good sources include egg yolks, legumes and lentils.

Folate contributes to:

  • maternal tissue growth during pregnancy
  • normal amino acid synthesis
  • normal blood formation
  • normal homocysteine metabolism
  • normal psychological function
  • the normal function of the immune system
  • the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
  • Folate has a role in the process of cell division
HIGH IN
Potassium
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High in Potassium

Potassium, the third most abundant mineral in the human body, is an essential mineral whose ions are vital for the functioning of all living cells!  Potassium plays a role at both the cellular and electrical level – considered and electrolyte because it carries a tiny electrical charge – it is found in red blood cells, muscles and bones.  Our bodies use potassium ions to conduct electrical impulses along muscle and nerve cells, it helps to boost the efficiency of nerve reflexes that transmit messages from one body part to another, this in turn helps in muscle contraction to perform various activities without tiring quickly. 

Potassium also has vasodilating properties that work to relieve the tension of blood vessels which is one of the main causes of high blood pressure.  It is helpful in reversing the role of sodium in unbalancing normal blood pressure thus acting as a vital component that maintains the normality of blood pressure in the human body.  The importance of potassium should not be underestimated in your dietary plan, most famously found in bananas other rich sources of potassium include spinach, avocados and coconut water.

Potassium contributes to:

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         the maintenance of normal blood pressure

HIGH IN
Phosphorus
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High in Phosphorus

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body.  In order to be properly utilised it must be in proper balance with calcium and magnesium in the blood, these are the two minerals it works in tandem with to create strong bones and teeth, also helping to lay the foundation of a strong skeletal structure.  It is an essential part of our diet - especially as children when the most bone growth and development occurs.  Both DNA and RNA contain phosphorus which make it important for cellular reproduction. 

Phosphorus also contributes to the repair process and maintenance of various body cells which suffer from daily wear and tear, it makes up part of the phospholipids that surround cells - phospholipids help to protect and regulate what goes in and out of each cell.  Phosphorus plays an essential role in how the body stores and uses energy, it aids in the process of energy extraction by stimulating the process of metabolism of different nutrients including niacin(B3) and riboflavin(B2), helping to maximise the uptake of these two vitamins in particular.  The best sources for this mineral are chlorella, dairy, whole grains, legumes and nuts.

Phosphorus contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         the normal growth and development of bone in children

·         the normal function of cell membranes

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Magnesium
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High in Magnesium

The importance of magnesium ions for all life itself, as well as for overall vibrant health, is hard to overstate.  Frequently referred to as the “miracle mineral”, magnesium is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions involving the creation of energy and its transport, the creation and synthesis of proteins and is involved in literally hundreds of enzymatic reactions - it activates the enzymes that make copies of DNA and RNA making it essential in the process of cell division. 

Roughly half of your body’s magnesium is stored in your bones and acts as a cofactor with calcium and vitamin D to maintain and strengthen the bone structure and teeth (your teeth can only form hard enamel from calcium if magnesium is available).  It also works, again in concert with calcium, to regulate electrical impulses in the cells.  Cellular calcium channels allow the mineral to enter the cell only as long as needed to conduct an impulse, it is ushered out immediately by magnesium once its task is fulfilled, operating as a natural calcium channel blocker and responsible for relaxation, magnesium is pivotally important to the functioning of the parasympathetic nervous system.  Both magnesium and calcium are intimately involved with muscle function (magnesium relaxes, calcium contracts) with frequent muscle cramps being a symptom of a deficiency in magnesium.  If magnesium is severely deficient, the brain is particularly affected as magnesium is crucial to the production of neurotransmitters and the integrity of the blood brain barrier and therefore is needed to maintain normal psychological function.  The best food sources of magnesium include; avocados, chia and hemp seeds, sesame seeds, raw cacao and raw chocolate, sprouted nuts/seeds, sea vegetables (such as kelp and nori), raw green vegetables and grass fed dairy products.

Magnesium contributes to:

·         a reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         electrolyte balance

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         normal protein synthesis

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         Magnesium has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Iron
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High in Iron

Iron is needed for a number of highly complex processes that continuously take place in the body on a molecular level and that are indispensable to human life.  Formation of haemoglobin is the chief function of this mineral – this is the primary protein found in red blood cells and represents about two thirds of the body’s iron.  Haemoglobin binds to the oxygen molecules that you breathe in from the air and releases them into your tissues.  The brain receives around 20% of the blood oxygen and a proper flow of blood to the brain can stimulate cognitive activity and help to create new neural pathways, it is especially important that children consume enough iron in their diet – iron deficiency in the first two years of a child’s life is associated with delayed cognitive and psychomotor development.  

Ribonucleic reductase is an iron dependant enzyme that is required for DNA synthesis (cell division), thus iron is required for a number of functions including healing and immune function - red blood cells are necessary for providing oxygen to damaged tissues, organs and cells.  Iron is also involved in food metabolism and is a cofactor and activator for some enzymes which play key roles in energy production and metabolism.  If iron stores are low symptoms can include tiredness, fatigue and dizziness.  Dietary iron has two forms, heme (animal based) and non-heme (plant based), important sources are; grass fed beef, oysters, spinach, lentils and beans.

Iron contributes to:

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin

·         normal oxygen transport in the body

·         normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         normal cognitive development of children

·         Iron has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Zinc
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High in Zinc

Zinc is a metal that functions as an essential nutrient in the body, it is found in every cell and has been used since ancient times, with Ayurvedic texts dating as far back as the 14th century recommending its application in various forms.  Although only required in limited amounts, zinc supports important bodily processes like strengthening the immune system – your body needs zinc to make T-cells, a type of white blood cell that fights off foreign invaders in your bloodstream.  With antioxidant properties, zinc helps to protect the cells in the body from damage by free radicals and supports the catalytic activity of various enzymes essential in DNA synthesis and cell division.  In males, zinc assists in spermatogenesis (the production of mature spermatozoa) and is a critical mineral for robust testosterone levels, in females it aids in all the reproductive phases including the birth and lactation stages. 

Zinc is an essential component of over 300 enzymes participating in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins and other macronutrients and has a regulatory role in vitamin A transport mediated through protein synthesis.  The intake of zinc has a positive influence on bone mass, it is an important cofactor in the stimulation of bone building osteoblasts (cells that synthesize bone), it accelerates the renewal of skin cells and it is essential for healthy nails and shiny hair.  Zinc is vital for vision with high concentrations found in the retina and may also protect from night blindness and prevent the development of cataracts.  This super nutrient also plays a crucial role in memory formation and cognitive stability, ensuring a proper intake of zinc is an important step towards optimal brain function.  Topping the list of zinc rich foods are oysters, however seeds such as chia, sunflower, hemp and pumpkin are also rich sources of this important mineral.

Zinc contributes to:

·         normal DNA synthesis

·         normal acid-base metabolism

·         normal carbohydrate metabolism

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal fertility and reproduction

·         normal macronutrient metabolism

·         normal metabolism of fatty acids

·         normal metabolism of Vitamin A

·         normal protein synthesis

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

HIGH IN
Copper
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High in Copper

An essential trace mineral in the body, copper has long been known to play a role in human health – its use dates back to 400 BC when Hippocrates is said to have employed it as a treatment for a variety of disorders.  Playing a beneficial role in immune function, you need copper for healthy white blood cells – the cell type tasked with seeking out, identifying and destroying pathogens.  Low copper levels lower your white blood count leaving you vulnerable to infection. 

Copper is a vital element of the dark pigment melanin which imparts colouration to the hair and skin, intake of copper is said to protect greying hair.  Copper helps in the absorption of iron from the intestinal tract and releases it from its primary storage sites like the liver.  Also playing a significant role in the synthesis of haemoglobin, myelin and collagen, copper helps to protect the myelin sheath surrounding the nerves and is actively involved in the production of an element of connective tissue, elastin.  Functioning as a coenzyme for energy metabolism from the macronutrients in food we consume, copper enables a normal metabolic process in association with amino acids and vitamins.  Oxidative stress is a characteristic of copper deficiency, when obtained from dietary sources it acts as an antioxidant, getting rid of free radicals which can damage your cells and DNA.  For your body to use copper you need to have a balance of zinc and manganese which is why it is best to obtain your copper from dietary sources where it is already in bioavailable form.  Topping the chart as the best source of copper are oysters!  Closely followed by kale, shitake mushrooms, seeds, nuts and nut butters.

Copper Contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal connective tissues

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal hair pigmentation

·         normal iron transport in the body

·         normal skin pigmentation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

 

 

HIGH IN
Manganese
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High in Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

SOURCE OF
Vitamin B3
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Source of Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3, also known as niacin, is an essential nutrient that must be provided for in your diet. The health benefits of niacin are primarily derived from its use in producing a coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or NAD, with one of the most important health benefits being its role in producing energy from dietary carbohydrates and fats.  Vitamin B3 seems to have a particularly potent role in maintaining mental agility and is important for the proper functioning of all cells including the cells of the brain and the nervous system - it acts as a powerful antioxidant in brain cells.  When the nervous system is working properly symptoms such as anxiety and mood swings can be prevented, even a slight deficiency in vitamin B3 can cause physical and mental fatigue. 

The most common symptom of niacin deficiency involves the skin with a severe deficiency leading to dermatitis and a condition called “pellagra” where a thick scaly rash develops in areas exposed to sunlight.  If pellagra is left untreated it can perturb the mucous membranes of the mouth and tongue making them red and swollen.  Vitamin B3 is found abundantly in chia seeds with just 100 grams providing approximately 55% of daily required levels.  Other good sources include sesame and sunflower seeds, nuts and nut butters, capers and brewer’s yeast.

Vitamin B3 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal mucous membranes

·         the maintenance of normal skin

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

SOURCE OF
Vitamin B6
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Source of Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, plays an essential role in human life and is the most versatile of all the B vitamins!  Working closely with the other B vitamins, vitamin B6 contributes to numerous functions in the body.  It plays an important role in refurbishing the immune system to the required functional level, this potential health benefit appears to be associated with its role in the metabolism of the amino acid tryptophan.  Also referred to as the “mood vitamin”, B6 is needed for proper brain development and function, preventing mental fatigue and helping the body make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine that relax and lift your spirits, along with melatonin, the hormone which regulates the body clock. 

Vitamin B6 is functional in working with a number of enzymatic systems to make these enzymes work in the desired manner, this association contributes to the proper functioning of the nervous system.  It is also involved at several steps in the metabolism of carbohydrates, in particular the enzyme that pulls carbohydrates out of storage in the cell - in the form of a molecule called glycogen – which requires vitamin B6 for its activity and it metabolises a number of other nutrients to extract energy.  Vitamin B6 is a key factor in the manufacture of haemoglobin – the oxygen carrying component of red blood cells – and has a role in preventing heart disease.  Without enough B6 a compound called homocysteine builds up in the body which can damage blood vessel linings, setting the stage for plaque build-up when the body tries to heal the damage.  Vitamin B6 prevents this build-up thereby reducing the risk of heart attack.  The availability of this important vitamin is highest in foods like spirulina, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, green beans, walnuts and wheat germ.

Vitamin B6 contributes to:

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal homocysteine metabolism

·         normal protein and glycogen metabolism

·         normal psychological function

·         normal red blood cell formation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         the regulation of hormonal activity

·         normal cysteine synthesis

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

SOURCE OF
Pantothenic Acid
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Source of Pantothenic Acid

Also called vitamin B5, pantothenic acid gets its name from the Greek root pantos meaning “everywhere” as it can be found throughout all living cells.  The most studied role of pantothenic acid in health support is its incorporation into a molecule called coenzyme A (CoA), this occupies a central place in energy metabolism, acting to allow carbohydrates, fats and proteins to be burned as energy sources.  It is also helpful in reducing body fatigue and weariness and it sets the metabolic process of the entire body on the right track making it capable of increasing the stamina of the human body. 

Sometimes referred to as the “anti-stress” vitamin, pantothenic acid may help to encourage the production of dopamine and serotonin which are neurotransmitter chemicals that regulate mood and reduce anxiety and stress.  Also aiding in the production of vitamin D, pantothenic acid supports the adrenal gland which produces steroid hormones and generally keeps the gland in optimal health.  Given the critical role it plays in health it’s a good thing that pantothenic acid is so ubiquitous in wholefoods with shiitake mushrooms providing the richest natural source of this essential nutrient, closely followed by cauliflower, sweet potato and broccoli.

Pantothenic acid contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal mental performance

·         normal synthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones, Vitamin D and some neurotransmitters

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

Organic Aduki Beans
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 70g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
70
 
Energy KJ/Kcal
1377KJ/329Kcal
964KJ/230Kcal
11.48%
Fat
0.5g
0.4g
0.50%
of which saturates
0.2g
0.1g
 
Carbohydrate
62.9g
44.0g
16.93%
of which sugars
0.0g
0.0g
0.00%
Protein
19.9g
13.9g
27.86%
Dietary Fibre
12.7g
8.9g
 
Salt
5.00mg
3.50mg
0.06%
Vitamin B1
0.50mg
0.35mg
31.82%
Vitamin B3
2.60mg
1.82mg
11.38%
Vitamin B6
0.40mg
0.28mg
20.00%
Folate
0.62mg
0.44mg
217.70%
Pantothenic acid
1.50mg
1.05mg
17.50%
Potassium
1254.00mg
877.80mg
43.89%
Phosphorus
381.00mg
266.70mg
38.10%
Magnesium
127.00mg
88.90mg
23.71%
Iron
5.00mg
3.50mg
25.00%
Zinc
5.00mg
3.50mg
35.00%
Copper
1.10mg
0.77mg
77.00%
Manganese
1.70mg
1.19mg
59.50%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult
  • Certified Organic by The Organic Food Federation.
  • Produced to GMP standards.
  • Quality Assured by Indigo Herbs.
  • Suitable for vegetarians and vegans.
  • Gluten free.
  • Re-sealable air tight, foil pouch.
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added.

Our Organic Aduki Beans come from selected farms which work according to strict EU regulations for organic agriculture. This means no artificial fertilisers or chemical pesticides are used - the environment is being protected and the natural balance stays intact. Upon harvest the beans are brought to the factory where they are cleaned, selected on size and polished. They are then laser sorted, hand picked, twice controlled on quality before being made ready for shipment. 

Must not be eaten raw - soak and cook thoroughly.

Buy Black Rice Organic 1kg from Indigo Herbs

Latin Name: Oryza sativa L

  • Certified Organic
  • Antioxidant Rich
  • Heart Healthy
  • Re-sealable airtight foil pouch
  • 100% Pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added
£7.99

Out of stock

Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • How to use

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

  • Contraindications

  • Blogs

  • Recipes

Black Rice Organic 1kg from Indigo Herbs is one of the most antioxidant rich rice varieties. Black Rice has a nutty, sweet taste making it a choice grain for rice salads and other unique hot dishes. Our Organic Black Rice grains are full of beneficial anthocyanins; an antioxidant that gives Black Rice it's dark colour.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality botanicals. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and wellbeing, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals.

Also known as: Black Rice, Forbidden Rice

Our Organic Black Rice is High in Vitamins B1 and B6, both crucial nutrients to the Central Nervous System. Sometimes referred to as the anti-stress vitamin, B1 assists in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress. B6 works with a number of enzymatic systems which contribute to the proper functioning of the nervous system. Both B Vitamins are important in the health of the brain, helping to prevent mental fatigue and aiding the body in making “feel good” hormones.

Also High in Phosphorus and Magnesium, these essential minerals are necessary for a strong skeletal structure, bones and teeth. Phosphorus must be in proper balance with Calcium and Magnesium and is the most abundant mineral in the body.

One serving of Black Rice provides a whopping 138% of the RDA for Manganese, a potent antioxidant mineral that is a component of the antioxidant enzyme “super-oxide dismutase”. SOD will seek out and destroy free radicals which can damage cell membranes and DNA.

A Source of Copper and Zinc – these two minerals are also powerfully antioxidant and immune system boosters. 

Our Wholefoods are 100% pure and unprocessed with nothing added. They are simple and easy to integrate into your daily diet. Seeds can be roasted or soaked and sprouted. Nuts can be made into nut milk, nut butter or snacked upon. Fruits can flavour a cake, bread or biscuits, or make a great topping to breakfast cereal.

Nuts, seeds and dried fruit all make great ingredients for a superfood snack trail mix, and can supply essential daily nutrients whilst being delicious and satisfying. For full instructions go to our How to use Wholefoods page.

  1. Rinse black rice in water.
  2. Heat oil in a pan, add rice and stir for 2 minutes.
  3. Add water and bring to a boil.
  4. Lower heat and cover pan. Cook for 45 minutes or until liquid is absorbed.
  5. Remove from heat and let rest for 10 minutes.
HIGH IN
Dietary Fibre
HIGH IN
Vitamin B1
more info...
High in Vitamin B1

Also known as thiamin, vitamin B1 is one of the eight water soluble vitamins in the vitamin B family.  It is a vital human nutrient playing an important role in how we convert our food into energy – when we consume our food it is broken down into simpler units such as carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, vitamin B1 plays a crucial role in utilising these units to produce energy.  This is especially true for cells in the brain where the energy demand is really high which is why it is also referred to as a “morale vitamin” for its positive effect on the nervous system and a healthy mental attitude! 

Promoting the health of the nervous system, vitamin B1 helps in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress, it is often called the “anti-stress” vitamin and is also reported to improve the memory and powers of concentration.  Thiamin is essential to the body’s cardiac heath, involved in blood formation and helping in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is used to relay messages between the nerves and muscles to ensure proper cardiac function.  Brewer’s yeast and liver are the richest sources of vitamin B1, however, spirulina, linseeds, rye, wheat germ and kidney beans are also important sources of this vitamin.

Vitamin B1 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the normal function of the heart

HIGH IN
Vitamin B6
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High in Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, plays an essential role in human life and is the most versatile of all the B vitamins!  Working closely with the other B vitamins, vitamin B6 contributes to numerous functions in the body.  It plays an important role in refurbishing the immune system to the required functional level, this potential health benefit appears to be associated with its role in the metabolism of the amino acid tryptophan.  Also referred to as the “mood vitamin”, B6 is needed for proper brain development and function, preventing mental fatigue and helping the body make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine that relax and lift your spirits, along with melatonin, the hormone which regulates the body clock. 

Vitamin B6 is functional in working with a number of enzymatic systems to make these enzymes work in the desired manner, this association contributes to the proper functioning of the nervous system.  It is also involved at several steps in the metabolism of carbohydrates, in particular the enzyme that pulls carbohydrates out of storage in the cell - in the form of a molecule called glycogen – which requires vitamin B6 for its activity and it metabolises a number of other nutrients to extract energy.  Vitamin B6 is a key factor in the manufacture of haemoglobin – the oxygen carrying component of red blood cells – and has a role in preventing heart disease.  Without enough B6 a compound called homocysteine builds up in the body which can damage blood vessel linings, setting the stage for plaque build-up when the body tries to heal the damage.  Vitamin B6 prevents this build-up thereby reducing the risk of heart attack.  The availability of this important vitamin is highest in foods like spirulina, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, green beans, walnuts and wheat germ.

Vitamin B6 contributes to:

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal homocysteine metabolism

·         normal protein and glycogen metabolism

·         normal psychological function

·         normal red blood cell formation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         the regulation of hormonal activity

·         normal cysteine synthesis

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Phosphorus
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High in Phosphorus

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body.  In order to be properly utilised it must be in proper balance with calcium and magnesium in the blood, these are the two minerals it works in tandem with to create strong bones and teeth, also helping to lay the foundation of a strong skeletal structure.  It is an essential part of our diet - especially as children when the most bone growth and development occurs.  Both DNA and RNA contain phosphorus which make it important for cellular reproduction. 

Phosphorus also contributes to the repair process and maintenance of various body cells which suffer from daily wear and tear, it makes up part of the phospholipids that surround cells - phospholipids help to protect and regulate what goes in and out of each cell.  Phosphorus plays an essential role in how the body stores and uses energy, it aids in the process of energy extraction by stimulating the process of metabolism of different nutrients including niacin(B3) and riboflavin(B2), helping to maximise the uptake of these two vitamins in particular.  The best sources for this mineral are chlorella, dairy, whole grains, legumes and nuts.

Phosphorus contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         the normal growth and development of bone in children

·         the normal function of cell membranes

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Magnesium
more info...
High in Magnesium

The importance of magnesium ions for all life itself, as well as for overall vibrant health, is hard to overstate.  Frequently referred to as the “miracle mineral”, magnesium is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions involving the creation of energy and its transport, the creation and synthesis of proteins and is involved in literally hundreds of enzymatic reactions - it activates the enzymes that make copies of DNA and RNA making it essential in the process of cell division. 

Roughly half of your body’s magnesium is stored in your bones and acts as a cofactor with calcium and vitamin D to maintain and strengthen the bone structure and teeth (your teeth can only form hard enamel from calcium if magnesium is available).  It also works, again in concert with calcium, to regulate electrical impulses in the cells.  Cellular calcium channels allow the mineral to enter the cell only as long as needed to conduct an impulse, it is ushered out immediately by magnesium once its task is fulfilled, operating as a natural calcium channel blocker and responsible for relaxation, magnesium is pivotally important to the functioning of the parasympathetic nervous system.  Both magnesium and calcium are intimately involved with muscle function (magnesium relaxes, calcium contracts) with frequent muscle cramps being a symptom of a deficiency in magnesium.  If magnesium is severely deficient, the brain is particularly affected as magnesium is crucial to the production of neurotransmitters and the integrity of the blood brain barrier and therefore is needed to maintain normal psychological function.  The best food sources of magnesium include; avocados, chia and hemp seeds, sesame seeds, raw cacao and raw chocolate, sprouted nuts/seeds, sea vegetables (such as kelp and nori), raw green vegetables and grass fed dairy products.

Magnesium contributes to:

·         a reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         electrolyte balance

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         normal protein synthesis

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         Magnesium has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Manganese
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High in Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

SOURCE OF
Vitamin B3
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Source of Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3, also known as niacin, is an essential nutrient that must be provided for in your diet. The health benefits of niacin are primarily derived from its use in producing a coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or NAD, with one of the most important health benefits being its role in producing energy from dietary carbohydrates and fats.  Vitamin B3 seems to have a particularly potent role in maintaining mental agility and is important for the proper functioning of all cells including the cells of the brain and the nervous system - it acts as a powerful antioxidant in brain cells.  When the nervous system is working properly symptoms such as anxiety and mood swings can be prevented, even a slight deficiency in vitamin B3 can cause physical and mental fatigue. 

The most common symptom of niacin deficiency involves the skin with a severe deficiency leading to dermatitis and a condition called “pellagra” where a thick scaly rash develops in areas exposed to sunlight.  If pellagra is left untreated it can perturb the mucous membranes of the mouth and tongue making them red and swollen.  Vitamin B3 is found abundantly in chia seeds with just 100 grams providing approximately 55% of daily required levels.  Other good sources include sesame and sunflower seeds, nuts and nut butters, capers and brewer’s yeast.

Vitamin B3 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal mucous membranes

·         the maintenance of normal skin

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

SOURCE OF
Pantothenic Acid
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Source of Pantothenic Acid

Also called vitamin B5, pantothenic acid gets its name from the Greek root pantos meaning “everywhere” as it can be found throughout all living cells.  The most studied role of pantothenic acid in health support is its incorporation into a molecule called coenzyme A (CoA), this occupies a central place in energy metabolism, acting to allow carbohydrates, fats and proteins to be burned as energy sources.  It is also helpful in reducing body fatigue and weariness and it sets the metabolic process of the entire body on the right track making it capable of increasing the stamina of the human body. 

Sometimes referred to as the “anti-stress” vitamin, pantothenic acid may help to encourage the production of dopamine and serotonin which are neurotransmitter chemicals that regulate mood and reduce anxiety and stress.  Also aiding in the production of vitamin D, pantothenic acid supports the adrenal gland which produces steroid hormones and generally keeps the gland in optimal health.  Given the critical role it plays in health it’s a good thing that pantothenic acid is so ubiquitous in wholefoods with shiitake mushrooms providing the richest natural source of this essential nutrient, closely followed by cauliflower, sweet potato and broccoli.

Pantothenic acid contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal mental performance

·         normal synthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones, Vitamin D and some neurotransmitters

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

SOURCE OF
Copper
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Source of Copper

An essential trace mineral in the body, copper has long been known to play a role in human health – its use dates back to 400 BC when Hippocrates is said to have employed it as a treatment for a variety of disorders.  Playing a beneficial role in immune function, you need copper for healthy white blood cells – the cell type tasked with seeking out, identifying and destroying pathogens.  Low copper levels lower your white blood count leaving you vulnerable to infection. 

Copper is a vital element of the dark pigment melanin which imparts colouration to the hair and skin, intake of copper is said to protect greying hair.  Copper helps in the absorption of iron from the intestinal tract and releases it from its primary storage sites like the liver.  Also playing a significant role in the synthesis of haemoglobin, myelin and collagen, copper helps to protect the myelin sheath surrounding the nerves and is actively involved in the production of an element of connective tissue, elastin.  Functioning as a coenzyme for energy metabolism from the macronutrients in food we consume, copper enables a normal metabolic process in association with amino acids and vitamins.  Oxidative stress is a characteristic of copper deficiency, when obtained from dietary sources it acts as an antioxidant, getting rid of free radicals which can damage your cells and DNA.  For your body to use copper you need to have a balance of zinc and manganese which is why it is best to obtain your copper from dietary sources where it is already in bioavailable form.  Topping the chart as the best source of copper are oysters!  Closely followed by kale, shitake mushrooms, seeds, nuts and nut butters.

Copper Contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal connective tissues

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal hair pigmentation

·         normal iron transport in the body

·         normal skin pigmentation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

 

 

SOURCE OF
Zinc
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Source of Zinc

Zinc is a metal that functions as an essential nutrient in the body, it is found in every cell and has been used since ancient times, with Ayurvedic texts dating as far back as the 14th century recommending its application in various forms.  Although only required in limited amounts, zinc supports important bodily processes like strengthening the immune system – your body needs zinc to make T-cells, a type of white blood cell that fights off foreign invaders in your bloodstream.  With antioxidant properties, zinc helps to protect the cells in the body from damage by free radicals and supports the catalytic activity of various enzymes essential in DNA synthesis and cell division.  In males, zinc assists in spermatogenesis (the production of mature spermatozoa) and is a critical mineral for robust testosterone levels, in females it aids in all the reproductive phases including the birth and lactation stages. 

Zinc is an essential component of over 300 enzymes participating in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins and other macronutrients and has a regulatory role in vitamin A transport mediated through protein synthesis.  The intake of zinc has a positive influence on bone mass, it is an important cofactor in the stimulation of bone building osteoblasts (cells that synthesize bone), it accelerates the renewal of skin cells and it is essential for healthy nails and shiny hair.  Zinc is vital for vision with high concentrations found in the retina and may also protect from night blindness and prevent the development of cataracts.  This super nutrient also plays a crucial role in memory formation and cognitive stability, ensuring a proper intake of zinc is an important step towards optimal brain function.  Topping the list of zinc rich foods are oysters, however seeds such as chia, sunflower, hemp and pumpkin are also rich sources of this important mineral.

Zinc contributes to:

·         normal DNA synthesis

·         normal acid-base metabolism

·         normal carbohydrate metabolism

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal fertility and reproduction

·         normal macronutrient metabolism

·         normal metabolism of fatty acids

·         normal metabolism of Vitamin A

·         normal protein synthesis

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

Organic Black Rice
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 75g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
75
 
Energy KJ/Kcal
1377KJ/325Kcal
1033KJ/244Kcal
12.29%
Fat
3.4g
2.6g
3.64%
of which saturates
0.9g
0.7g
 
Carbohydrate
63.7g
47.8g
18.38%
of which sugars
1.2g
0.9g
1.00%
Protein
3.7g
2.8g
5.55%
Dietary Fibre
9.9g
7.4g
 
Salt
5.00mg
3.75mg
0.06%
Vitamin B1
0.41mg
0.31mg
28.16%
Vitamin B3
4.30mg
3.23mg
20.16%
Vitamin B6
0.51mg
0.38mg
27.27%
Pantothenic acid
1.50mg
1.13mg
18.75%
Phosphorus
264.00mg
198.00mg
28.29%
Magnesium
143.00mg
107.25mg
28.60%
Zinc
2.02mg
1.52mg
15.15%
Copper
0.28mg
0.21mg
20.78%
Manganese
3.70mg
2.78mg
138.75%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult
  • Certified Organic by The Organic Food Federation
  • Produced to GMP standards
  • Quality Assured by Indigo Herbs
  • Suitable for vegetarians and vegans
  • Gluten free
  • Re-sealable air tight, foil pouch
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added

Our Organic Black Rice is grown in certified organic land. After it is reaped it is left in the field to dry naturally under the sun. It is then threshed to separate the grain from the rest of the crop before it goes on for cleaning – removing immature, unfilled, non-grain materials. The rice is then thoroughly tested for heavy metals and foreign particles before being packed and made ready for shipment. 

May cause bloating if consumed in large amounts

Buy Brown Basmati Rice Organic 1kg from Indigo Herbs

Latin Name: Oryza Sativa

  • Certified Organic
  • Fibre Rich
  • Heart Healthy
  • Re-sealable airtight foil pouch
  • 100% Pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added
£4.99
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

  • Contraindications

  • Blogs

  • Recipes

Brown Basmati Rice Organic 1kg from Indigo Herbs is a very high quality basmati rice with the added health benefits of being of the brown variety. Our Brown Basmati Rice is very flavourful and great in dishes from the Indian subcontinent. Use this Basmati Rice in all kinds of hot and cold dishes for a truly healthy meal.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality botanicals. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and wellbeing, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals.

Also known as: Brown Basmati Rice

Our Organic Brown Basmati Rice is High in Vitamins B1, B3 and B6, crucial nutrients to the Central Nervous System. Sometimes referred to as the anti-stress vitamin, B1 assists in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress. B6 works with a number of enzymatic systems which contribute to the proper functioning of the nervous system. These B Vitamins are important in the health of the brain. B3 in particular acts as a powerful antioxidant in brain cells, helping to prevent mental fatigue and aiding the body in making “feel good” hormones.

Also High in Phosphorus and Magnesium, these essential minerals are necessary for a strong skeletal structure, bones and teeth. Phosphorus must be in proper balance with Calcium and Magnesium and is the most abundant mineral in the body.

One serving of Brown Basmati Rice provides a whopping 138% of the RDA for Manganese, a potent antioxidant mineral that is a component of the antioxidant enzyme “super-oxide dismutase”. SOD will seek out and destroy free radicals which can damage cell membranes and DNA. A portion of Brown Basmati Rice also provides a good helping of Copper and Selenium – antioxidant minerals that are also necessary to the proper functioning of the immune system.

Drain, and combine 1 cup rice with 2 cups water and salt to taste (1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon) in a medium saucepan. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer 35 to 40 minutes until all of the liquid is absorbed. Remove from the heat, remove the lid and place a kitchen towel over the pan.

HIGH IN
Vitamin B1
more info...
High in Vitamin B1

Also known as thiamin, vitamin B1 is one of the eight water soluble vitamins in the vitamin B family.  It is a vital human nutrient playing an important role in how we convert our food into energy – when we consume our food it is broken down into simpler units such as carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, vitamin B1 plays a crucial role in utilising these units to produce energy.  This is especially true for cells in the brain where the energy demand is really high which is why it is also referred to as a “morale vitamin” for its positive effect on the nervous system and a healthy mental attitude! 

Promoting the health of the nervous system, vitamin B1 helps in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress, it is often called the “anti-stress” vitamin and is also reported to improve the memory and powers of concentration.  Thiamin is essential to the body’s cardiac heath, involved in blood formation and helping in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is used to relay messages between the nerves and muscles to ensure proper cardiac function.  Brewer’s yeast and liver are the richest sources of vitamin B1, however, spirulina, linseeds, rye, wheat germ and kidney beans are also important sources of this vitamin.

Vitamin B1 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the normal function of the heart

HIGH IN
Vitamin B3
more info...
High in Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3, also known as niacin, is an essential nutrient that must be provided for in your diet. The health benefits of niacin are primarily derived from its use in producing a coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or NAD, with one of the most important health benefits being its role in producing energy from dietary carbohydrates and fats.  Vitamin B3 seems to have a particularly potent role in maintaining mental agility and is important for the proper functioning of all cells including the cells of the brain and the nervous system - it acts as a powerful antioxidant in brain cells.  When the nervous system is working properly symptoms such as anxiety and mood swings can be prevented, even a slight deficiency in vitamin B3 can cause physical and mental fatigue. 

The most common symptom of niacin deficiency involves the skin with a severe deficiency leading to dermatitis and a condition called “pellagra” where a thick scaly rash develops in areas exposed to sunlight.  If pellagra is left untreated it can perturb the mucous membranes of the mouth and tongue making them red and swollen.  Vitamin B3 is found abundantly in chia seeds with just 100 grams providing approximately 55% of daily required levels.  Other good sources include sesame and sunflower seeds, nuts and nut butters, capers and brewer’s yeast.

Vitamin B3 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal mucous membranes

·         the maintenance of normal skin

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

HIGH IN
Vitamin B6
more info...
High in Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, plays an essential role in human life and is the most versatile of all the B vitamins!  Working closely with the other B vitamins, vitamin B6 contributes to numerous functions in the body.  It plays an important role in refurbishing the immune system to the required functional level, this potential health benefit appears to be associated with its role in the metabolism of the amino acid tryptophan.  Also referred to as the “mood vitamin”, B6 is needed for proper brain development and function, preventing mental fatigue and helping the body make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine that relax and lift your spirits, along with melatonin, the hormone which regulates the body clock. 

Vitamin B6 is functional in working with a number of enzymatic systems to make these enzymes work in the desired manner, this association contributes to the proper functioning of the nervous system.  It is also involved at several steps in the metabolism of carbohydrates, in particular the enzyme that pulls carbohydrates out of storage in the cell - in the form of a molecule called glycogen – which requires vitamin B6 for its activity and it metabolises a number of other nutrients to extract energy.  Vitamin B6 is a key factor in the manufacture of haemoglobin – the oxygen carrying component of red blood cells – and has a role in preventing heart disease.  Without enough B6 a compound called homocysteine builds up in the body which can damage blood vessel linings, setting the stage for plaque build-up when the body tries to heal the damage.  Vitamin B6 prevents this build-up thereby reducing the risk of heart attack.  The availability of this important vitamin is highest in foods like spirulina, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, green beans, walnuts and wheat germ.

Vitamin B6 contributes to:

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal homocysteine metabolism

·         normal protein and glycogen metabolism

·         normal psychological function

·         normal red blood cell formation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         the regulation of hormonal activity

·         normal cysteine synthesis

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Phosphorus
more info...
High in Phosphorus

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body.  In order to be properly utilised it must be in proper balance with calcium and magnesium in the blood, these are the two minerals it works in tandem with to create strong bones and teeth, also helping to lay the foundation of a strong skeletal structure.  It is an essential part of our diet - especially as children when the most bone growth and development occurs.  Both DNA and RNA contain phosphorus which make it important for cellular reproduction. 

Phosphorus also contributes to the repair process and maintenance of various body cells which suffer from daily wear and tear, it makes up part of the phospholipids that surround cells - phospholipids help to protect and regulate what goes in and out of each cell.  Phosphorus plays an essential role in how the body stores and uses energy, it aids in the process of energy extraction by stimulating the process of metabolism of different nutrients including niacin(B3) and riboflavin(B2), helping to maximise the uptake of these two vitamins in particular.  The best sources for this mineral are chlorella, dairy, whole grains, legumes and nuts.

Phosphorus contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         the normal growth and development of bone in children

·         the normal function of cell membranes

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Magnesium
more info...
High in Magnesium

The importance of magnesium ions for all life itself, as well as for overall vibrant health, is hard to overstate.  Frequently referred to as the “miracle mineral”, magnesium is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions involving the creation of energy and its transport, the creation and synthesis of proteins and is involved in literally hundreds of enzymatic reactions - it activates the enzymes that make copies of DNA and RNA making it essential in the process of cell division. 

Roughly half of your body’s magnesium is stored in your bones and acts as a cofactor with calcium and vitamin D to maintain and strengthen the bone structure and teeth (your teeth can only form hard enamel from calcium if magnesium is available).  It also works, again in concert with calcium, to regulate electrical impulses in the cells.  Cellular calcium channels allow the mineral to enter the cell only as long as needed to conduct an impulse, it is ushered out immediately by magnesium once its task is fulfilled, operating as a natural calcium channel blocker and responsible for relaxation, magnesium is pivotally important to the functioning of the parasympathetic nervous system.  Both magnesium and calcium are intimately involved with muscle function (magnesium relaxes, calcium contracts) with frequent muscle cramps being a symptom of a deficiency in magnesium.  If magnesium is severely deficient, the brain is particularly affected as magnesium is crucial to the production of neurotransmitters and the integrity of the blood brain barrier and therefore is needed to maintain normal psychological function.  The best food sources of magnesium include; avocados, chia and hemp seeds, sesame seeds, raw cacao and raw chocolate, sprouted nuts/seeds, sea vegetables (such as kelp and nori), raw green vegetables and grass fed dairy products.

Magnesium contributes to:

·         a reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         electrolyte balance

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         normal protein synthesis

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         Magnesium has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Copper
more info...
High in Copper

An essential trace mineral in the body, copper has long been known to play a role in human health – its use dates back to 400 BC when Hippocrates is said to have employed it as a treatment for a variety of disorders.  Playing a beneficial role in immune function, you need copper for healthy white blood cells – the cell type tasked with seeking out, identifying and destroying pathogens.  Low copper levels lower your white blood count leaving you vulnerable to infection. 

Copper is a vital element of the dark pigment melanin which imparts colouration to the hair and skin, intake of copper is said to protect greying hair.  Copper helps in the absorption of iron from the intestinal tract and releases it from its primary storage sites like the liver.  Also playing a significant role in the synthesis of haemoglobin, myelin and collagen, copper helps to protect the myelin sheath surrounding the nerves and is actively involved in the production of an element of connective tissue, elastin.  Functioning as a coenzyme for energy metabolism from the macronutrients in food we consume, copper enables a normal metabolic process in association with amino acids and vitamins.  Oxidative stress is a characteristic of copper deficiency, when obtained from dietary sources it acts as an antioxidant, getting rid of free radicals which can damage your cells and DNA.  For your body to use copper you need to have a balance of zinc and manganese which is why it is best to obtain your copper from dietary sources where it is already in bioavailable form.  Topping the chart as the best source of copper are oysters!  Closely followed by kale, shitake mushrooms, seeds, nuts and nut butters.

Copper Contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal connective tissues

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal hair pigmentation

·         normal iron transport in the body

·         normal skin pigmentation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

 

 

HIGH IN
Manganese
more info...
High in Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

HIGH IN
Selenium
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High in Selenium

Selenium is an essential trace element that plays an important role in a number of physiological processes in humans.  It is a key element in spermatogenesis (the production or development of mature spermatozoa) and male fertility.  Selenium has also been shown to support the immune system by promoting the production of killer T-cells (a type of white blood cell), which engulf and destroy harmful foreign substances that enter the body and could otherwise cause disease and infection.  Selenium works in close conjunction with vitamin E as an antioxidant to prevent the formation of free radicals which can weaken and damage cells in every organ system. 

In addition, research has shown that selenium is an essential component of the thyroid gland’s functions, helping to regulate the amount of the thyroid hormone T3 that is produced within the body – without selenium the T3 hormone cannot be produced which can be catastrophic to a wide variety of your body’s systems.  It is believed that good selenium intake can help to prevent hair loss and promote shiny hair and healthy nail growthBrazil nuts are the richest source of selenium discovered so far, also found in mushrooms, shellfish, garlic, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, selenium is destroyed when foods are refined or processed so eating a variety of whole, unprocessed foods is the best way to get selenium into your diet.

Selenium contributes to:

·         normal spermatogenesis

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         normal thyroid function

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

SOURCE OF
Pantothenic Acid
more info...
Source of Pantothenic Acid

Also called vitamin B5, pantothenic acid gets its name from the Greek root pantos meaning “everywhere” as it can be found throughout all living cells.  The most studied role of pantothenic acid in health support is its incorporation into a molecule called coenzyme A (CoA), this occupies a central place in energy metabolism, acting to allow carbohydrates, fats and proteins to be burned as energy sources.  It is also helpful in reducing body fatigue and weariness and it sets the metabolic process of the entire body on the right track making it capable of increasing the stamina of the human body. 

Sometimes referred to as the “anti-stress” vitamin, pantothenic acid may help to encourage the production of dopamine and serotonin which are neurotransmitter chemicals that regulate mood and reduce anxiety and stress.  Also aiding in the production of vitamin D, pantothenic acid supports the adrenal gland which produces steroid hormones and generally keeps the gland in optimal health.  Given the critical role it plays in health it’s a good thing that pantothenic acid is so ubiquitous in wholefoods with shiitake mushrooms providing the richest natural source of this essential nutrient, closely followed by cauliflower, sweet potato and broccoli.

Pantothenic acid contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal mental performance

·         normal synthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones, Vitamin D and some neurotransmitters

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

SOURCE OF
Zinc
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Source of Zinc

Zinc is a metal that functions as an essential nutrient in the body, it is found in every cell and has been used since ancient times, with Ayurvedic texts dating as far back as the 14th century recommending its application in various forms.  Although only required in limited amounts, zinc supports important bodily processes like strengthening the immune system – your body needs zinc to make T-cells, a type of white blood cell that fights off foreign invaders in your bloodstream.  With antioxidant properties, zinc helps to protect the cells in the body from damage by free radicals and supports the catalytic activity of various enzymes essential in DNA synthesis and cell division.  In males, zinc assists in spermatogenesis (the production of mature spermatozoa) and is a critical mineral for robust testosterone levels, in females it aids in all the reproductive phases including the birth and lactation stages. 

Zinc is an essential component of over 300 enzymes participating in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins and other macronutrients and has a regulatory role in vitamin A transport mediated through protein synthesis.  The intake of zinc has a positive influence on bone mass, it is an important cofactor in the stimulation of bone building osteoblasts (cells that synthesize bone), it accelerates the renewal of skin cells and it is essential for healthy nails and shiny hair.  Zinc is vital for vision with high concentrations found in the retina and may also protect from night blindness and prevent the development of cataracts.  This super nutrient also plays a crucial role in memory formation and cognitive stability, ensuring a proper intake of zinc is an important step towards optimal brain function.  Topping the list of zinc rich foods are oysters, however seeds such as chia, sunflower, hemp and pumpkin are also rich sources of this important mineral.

Zinc contributes to:

·         normal DNA synthesis

·         normal acid-base metabolism

·         normal carbohydrate metabolism

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal fertility and reproduction

·         normal macronutrient metabolism

·         normal metabolism of fatty acids

·         normal metabolism of Vitamin A

·         normal protein synthesis

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

Organic Brown Basmati Rice
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 75g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
75
 
Energy KJ/Kcal
1520KJ/357Kcal
1140KJ/268Kcal
13.57%
Fat
2.8g
2.1g
3.00%
of which saturates
0.7g
0.5g
 
Carbohydrate
81.0g
60.8g
23.37%
of which sugars
1.3g
1.0g
1.08%
Protein
6.7g
5.0g
10.05%
Dietary Fibre
1.9g
1.4g
 
Salt
0.00mg
0.00mg
0.00%
Vitamin B1
0.40mg
0.30mg
27.27%
Vitamin B3
5.10mg
3.83mg
23.91%
Vitamin B6
0.50mg
0.38mg
26.79%
Pantothenic acid
1.50mg
1.13mg
18.75%
Phosphorus
333.00mg
249.75mg
35.68%
Magnesium
143.00mg
107.25mg
28.60%
Zinc
2.00mg
1.50mg
15.00%
Copper
0.30mg
0.23mg
22.50%
Manganese
3.70mg
2.78mg
138.75%
Selenium
0.02mg
0.02mg
31.91%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult
  • Certified Organic by The Organic Food Federation
  • Produced to GMP standards
  • Quality Assured by Indigo Herbs
  • Suitable for vegetarians and vegans
  • Gluten free
  • Re-sealable air tight, foil pouch
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added

Our Organic Brown Basmati Rice is grown in certified organic land. When the Basmati Rice plants ripen in around 3 months, the harvest is ready. The fields are then hand harvested and the Brown Basmati Rice is then cleaned and hulled. The rice is then thoroughly tested for heavy metals and foreign particles before being packed and made ready for shipment.

May cause bloating if consumed in large amounts

Buy Organic Brown Lentils 1kg from Indigo Herbs

Latin Name: Lens culinaris

  • Certified Organic
  • High in Protein & Minerals
  • Mild Taste and great in Curries
  • Resealable air tight, foil pouch
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added
£5.49-£5.49
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

  • Contraindications

Organic Brown Lentils from Indigo Herbs come from certified Organic Brown Lentil crops. Brown Lentils are a classic food staple and essential part of the kitchen for vegans and vegetarians. Lentils are a great source of protein and an indispensable ingredient in curries and cooking from the Indian subcontinent.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality Wholefoods. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and well being, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals and Superfoods.

A portion of Lentils will provide around 33% of your daily Protein needs, which is why they are so popular with vegetarians and vegans as a valuable source of this most important nutrient. Although they are not a complete protein (containing all 9 amino essential amino acids), regular lentils are lacking 2 of these. They can easily be paired up with other proteins, and with a varied diet, you can obtain all of the essential amino acids even if you primarily eat incomplete proteins.

Also packed with other essential nutrients, lentils are exceptionally rich in Folate, an essential B-complex vitamin whose role in a healthy pregnancy is most widely known. It is necessary for the production of new DNA which is needed for the production of new cells – the growing life within the womb engages in constant cell division and the mother must expand her blood supply with the production of new red blood cells – these activities demand a generous supply of Folate. Within the body, Folate is an activator – it has an influence on “natural killer” cells of the immune system which are in charge of fighting infections and malignant cells. One 70g serving of Lentils provides a whopping 63% of the RDA of this important vitamin.

You will also get 21% of your RDA of Copper from a portion of Lentils, this antioxidant mineral acts as a co-factor for the vital enzyme Superoxide Dismutase, a powerful enzyme which boost’s the body’s antioxidant defence by reducing cellular damage.

A source of many other nutrients, Vitamins B1 and B6 will provide immune support and promote proper brain function – regulating the central nervous system, preventing mental fatigue and helping to make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine.

Lentils make a valuable addition to any diet and can be incorporated into many delicious dishes – vegetarian or not - they are tasty, wholesome and nutritionally dense. 

Brown lentils should be rinsed in cold water before cooking. Some people prefer to soak lentils overnight. After this initial preparation Brown Lentils can cooked by adding three times as much water to a pan and boiling for 35 - 45 minutes. drain and serve. 

HIGH IN
Protein
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High in Protein

Proteins are a group of biological compounds which are present in every live cell, organ and tissue of the body.  Meaning “first” or “of prime importance” in Greek, proteins participate in every cellular process occurring in the body.  Proteins are made up of structures called amino acids, there are a total of 21 amino acids, 9 are essential, the rest are nonessential – you must consume the essential amino acids in your diet because your body cannot make them. 

Dietary protein supports bone health in three main ways: by supplying the raw material required to construct soft bone matrix, by increasing plasma IGF1 and by promoting muscle growth and retention.  IGF1 is a growth hormone that stimulates and increases the activity of osteoblasts (cells which secrete the substance of bone).  It is especially important to ensure that children get enough protein since they are still developing and it is necessary to ensure their growth is unimpaired.  Proteins play an important role in muscle contraction and coordination, they are present in the muscle tissues in the form of many microfilaments and provide muscle structure.  Muscle growth depends on the adequacy of proteins in the body.  Proteins function as building blocks for muscles, bones and cartilage, opt for a variety of whole foods to meet your protein needs including; grass fed meat and poultry, eggs, dairy, seeds, beans and nuts.

Protein contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         a growth in muscle mass

·         the maintenance of muscle mass

·         Protein is needed for normal growth and development of bone in children.

HIGH IN
Folate
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High in Folate

Folate – the naturally occurring vitamin B9 – is often confused with folic acid.  Folic acid is a synthetically derived molecule created in a German laboratory in the 1940s and does not occur naturally in food.  Needless to say, folate metabolizes faster in the body and any excess is excreted through the urine whereas folic acid can accumulate in the blood and may adversely affect immune cell function.  Nature knows best when it comes to nutrition!  Folate is probably the vitamin whose essential role in pregnancy is most widely known.  It is necessary for the production of new DNA which is needed for the production of new cells – the growing life within the womb engages in constant cell division and the mother must expand her blood supply with the production of new red blood cells – these activities demand a generous supply of folate. 

Folate works to convert the amino acid homocysteine into methionine - a deficiency allows homocysteine levels to accumulate in the body.  High levels of homocysteine are associated with heart disease and stroke and can block blood and other nutrients from reaching the brain, interfering with the production of the feel good hormones serotonin and dopamine which regulate mood.  Within the body, folate is an activator – it has an influence on “natural killer” cells of the immune system which are in charge of fighting infections and malignant cells.  Romaine lettuce, spinach and asparagus are especially high in folate; other good sources include egg yolks, legumes and lentils.

Folate contributes to:

  • maternal tissue growth during pregnancy
  • normal amino acid synthesis
  • normal blood formation
  • normal homocysteine metabolism
  • normal psychological function
  • the normal function of the immune system
  • the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
  • Folate has a role in the process of cell division
HIGH IN
Copper
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High in Copper

An essential trace mineral in the body, copper has long been known to play a role in human health – its use dates back to 400 BC when Hippocrates is said to have employed it as a treatment for a variety of disorders.  Playing a beneficial role in immune function, you need copper for healthy white blood cells – the cell type tasked with seeking out, identifying and destroying pathogens.  Low copper levels lower your white blood count leaving you vulnerable to infection. 

Copper is a vital element of the dark pigment melanin which imparts colouration to the hair and skin, intake of copper is said to protect greying hair.  Copper helps in the absorption of iron from the intestinal tract and releases it from its primary storage sites like the liver.  Also playing a significant role in the synthesis of haemoglobin, myelin and collagen, copper helps to protect the myelin sheath surrounding the nerves and is actively involved in the production of an element of connective tissue, elastin.  Functioning as a coenzyme for energy metabolism from the macronutrients in food we consume, copper enables a normal metabolic process in association with amino acids and vitamins.  Oxidative stress is a characteristic of copper deficiency, when obtained from dietary sources it acts as an antioxidant, getting rid of free radicals which can damage your cells and DNA.  For your body to use copper you need to have a balance of zinc and manganese which is why it is best to obtain your copper from dietary sources where it is already in bioavailable form.  Topping the chart as the best source of copper are oysters!  Closely followed by kale, shitake mushrooms, seeds, nuts and nut butters.

Copper Contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal connective tissues

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal hair pigmentation

·         normal iron transport in the body

·         normal skin pigmentation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

 

 

SOURCE OF
Dietary Fibre
SOURCE OF
Vitamin B1
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Source of Vitamin B1

Also known as thiamin, vitamin B1 is one of the eight water soluble vitamins in the vitamin B family.  It is a vital human nutrient playing an important role in how we convert our food into energy – when we consume our food it is broken down into simpler units such as carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, vitamin B1 plays a crucial role in utilising these units to produce energy.  This is especially true for cells in the brain where the energy demand is really high which is why it is also referred to as a “morale vitamin” for its positive effect on the nervous system and a healthy mental attitude! 

Promoting the health of the nervous system, vitamin B1 helps in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress, it is often called the “anti-stress” vitamin and is also reported to improve the memory and powers of concentration.  Thiamin is essential to the body’s cardiac heath, involved in blood formation and helping in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is used to relay messages between the nerves and muscles to ensure proper cardiac function.  Brewer’s yeast and liver are the richest sources of vitamin B1, however, spirulina, linseeds, rye, wheat germ and kidney beans are also important sources of this vitamin.

Vitamin B1 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the normal function of the heart

SOURCE OF
Vitamin B6
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Source of Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, plays an essential role in human life and is the most versatile of all the B vitamins!  Working closely with the other B vitamins, vitamin B6 contributes to numerous functions in the body.  It plays an important role in refurbishing the immune system to the required functional level, this potential health benefit appears to be associated with its role in the metabolism of the amino acid tryptophan.  Also referred to as the “mood vitamin”, B6 is needed for proper brain development and function, preventing mental fatigue and helping the body make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine that relax and lift your spirits, along with melatonin, the hormone which regulates the body clock. 

Vitamin B6 is functional in working with a number of enzymatic systems to make these enzymes work in the desired manner, this association contributes to the proper functioning of the nervous system.  It is also involved at several steps in the metabolism of carbohydrates, in particular the enzyme that pulls carbohydrates out of storage in the cell - in the form of a molecule called glycogen – which requires vitamin B6 for its activity and it metabolises a number of other nutrients to extract energy.  Vitamin B6 is a key factor in the manufacture of haemoglobin – the oxygen carrying component of red blood cells – and has a role in preventing heart disease.  Without enough B6 a compound called homocysteine builds up in the body which can damage blood vessel linings, setting the stage for plaque build-up when the body tries to heal the damage.  Vitamin B6 prevents this build-up thereby reducing the risk of heart attack.  The availability of this important vitamin is highest in foods like spirulina, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, green beans, walnuts and wheat germ.

Vitamin B6 contributes to:

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal homocysteine metabolism

·         normal protein and glycogen metabolism

·         normal psychological function

·         normal red blood cell formation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         the regulation of hormonal activity

·         normal cysteine synthesis

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

SOURCE OF
Potassium
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Source of Potassium

Potassium, the third most abundant mineral in the human body, is an essential mineral whose ions are vital for the functioning of all living cells!  Potassium plays a role at both the cellular and electrical level – considered and electrolyte because it carries a tiny electrical charge – it is found in red blood cells, muscles and bones.  Our bodies use potassium ions to conduct electrical impulses along muscle and nerve cells, it helps to boost the efficiency of nerve reflexes that transmit messages from one body part to another, this in turn helps in muscle contraction to perform various activities without tiring quickly. 

Potassium also has vasodilating properties that work to relieve the tension of blood vessels which is one of the main causes of high blood pressure.  It is helpful in reversing the role of sodium in unbalancing normal blood pressure thus acting as a vital component that maintains the normality of blood pressure in the human body.  The importance of potassium should not be underestimated in your dietary plan, most famously found in bananas other rich sources of potassium include spinach, avocados and coconut water.

Potassium contributes to:

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         the maintenance of normal blood pressure

SOURCE OF
Phosphorus
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Source of Phosphorus

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body.  In order to be properly utilised it must be in proper balance with calcium and magnesium in the blood, these are the two minerals it works in tandem with to create strong bones and teeth, also helping to lay the foundation of a strong skeletal structure.  It is an essential part of our diet - especially as children when the most bone growth and development occurs.  Both DNA and RNA contain phosphorus which make it important for cellular reproduction. 

Phosphorus also contributes to the repair process and maintenance of various body cells which suffer from daily wear and tear, it makes up part of the phospholipids that surround cells - phospholipids help to protect and regulate what goes in and out of each cell.  Phosphorus plays an essential role in how the body stores and uses energy, it aids in the process of energy extraction by stimulating the process of metabolism of different nutrients including niacin(B3) and riboflavin(B2), helping to maximise the uptake of these two vitamins in particular.  The best sources for this mineral are chlorella, dairy, whole grains, legumes and nuts.

Phosphorus contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         the normal growth and development of bone in children

·         the normal function of cell membranes

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

SOURCE OF
Iron
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Source of Iron

Iron is needed for a number of highly complex processes that continuously take place in the body on a molecular level and that are indispensable to human life.  Formation of haemoglobin is the chief function of this mineral – this is the primary protein found in red blood cells and represents about two thirds of the body’s iron.  Haemoglobin binds to the oxygen molecules that you breathe in from the air and releases them into your tissues.  The brain receives around 20% of the blood oxygen and a proper flow of blood to the brain can stimulate cognitive activity and help to create new neural pathways, it is especially important that children consume enough iron in their diet – iron deficiency in the first two years of a child’s life is associated with delayed cognitive and psychomotor development.  

Ribonucleic reductase is an iron dependant enzyme that is required for DNA synthesis (cell division), thus iron is required for a number of functions including healing and immune function - red blood cells are necessary for providing oxygen to damaged tissues, organs and cells.  Iron is also involved in food metabolism and is a cofactor and activator for some enzymes which play key roles in energy production and metabolism.  If iron stores are low symptoms can include tiredness, fatigue and dizziness.  Dietary iron has two forms, heme (animal based) and non-heme (plant based), important sources are; grass fed beef, oysters, spinach, lentils and beans.

Iron contributes to:

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin

·         normal oxygen transport in the body

·         normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         normal cognitive development of children

·         Iron has a role in the process of cell division

SOURCE OF
Manganese
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Source of Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

Organic Brown Lentils
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 70g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
70
 
Energy KJ/Kcal
1353KJ/318Kcal
947KJ/223Kcal
11.28%
Fat
1.3g
0.9g
1.30%
of which saturates
0.2g
0.1g
 
Carbohydrate
56.3g
39.4g
15.16%
of which sugars
1.2g
0.8g
0.93%
Protein
23.8g
16.7g
33.32%
Dietary Fibre
4.9g
3.4g
 
Salt
90.00mg
63.00mg
1.05%
Vitamin B1
0.20mg
0.14mg
12.73%
Vitamin B6
0.21mg
0.15mg
10.50%
Folate
0.18mg
0.13mg
63.35%
Potassium
369.00mg
258.30mg
12.92%
Phosphorus
180.00mg
126.00mg
18.00%
Iron
3.30mg
2.31mg
16.50%
Copper
0.30mg
0.21mg
21.00%
Manganese
0.50mg
0.35mg
17.50%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult

Lentils are a staple food on the Indian subcontinent and one of the most popular crops in the world. Lentils are a cool weather crop that's harvested around June - July. These Organic Brown Lentils have come strictly certified organic land and come free from any pesticides or man made fertilisers.

Over consumption of Lentils can lead to flatulence.

Buy Brown Rice Organic Short Grain 1kg from Indigo Herbs

Latin Name: Oryza Sativa

  • Certified Organic
  • Fibre Rich
  • Heart Healthy
  • Re-sealable airtight foil pouch
  • 100% Pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added

 

£4.99
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • How to use

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

  • Contraindications

  • Blogs

  • Recipes

Brown Short Grain Rice Organic 1kg from Indigo Herbs is a nutritionally dense fibre rich rice with the added health benefits of being of the brown variety. Our Brown Rice is very flavourful and fantastic for all kinds of dishes from the Indian. Use this Short Grain Brown Rice in all kinds of hot and cold dishes for a truly healthy hearty meal.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality botanicals. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and wellbeing, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals.

Also known as: Brown Rice

Our Organic Brown Rice is High in Manganese, a highly antioxidant mineral which is a component of the antioxidant enzyme super-oxide dismutase (SOD). This enzyme is tasked with seeking out and neutralising free radicals, thus protecting the cells from damage. Manganese is essential for the proper growth and formation of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding the increase of mineral density in the spine.

Brown Rice is also a Source of Selenium – a critical nutrient for the thyroid, helping to regulate and balance the thyroid hormones. 

Our Wholefoods are 100% pure and unprocessed with nothing added. They are simple and easy to integrate into your daily diet. Seeds can be roasted or soaked and sprouted. Nuts can be made into nut milk, nut butter or snacked upon. Fruits can flavour a cake, bread or biscuits, or make a great topping to breakfast cereal.

Nuts, seeds and dried fruit all make great ingredients for a superfood snack trail mix, and can supply essential daily nutrients whilst being delicious and satisfying. For full instructions go to our How to use Wholefoods page.

  1. Bring water to a boil.
  2. Once water is boiling, add brown rice, cover, and reduce to simmer.
  3. Simmer for 45 minutes, without opening the pan.
  4. After 45 minutes, turn off heat and let sit for 15 minutes.
  5. Do not open the pan until 15 minutes are up.
  6. Open pan and fluff perfect rice.
HIGH IN
Manganese
more info...
High in Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

SOURCE OF
Dietary Fibre
SOURCE OF
Selenium
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Source of Selenium

Selenium is an essential trace element that plays an important role in a number of physiological processes in humans.  It is a key element in spermatogenesis (the production or development of mature spermatozoa) and male fertility.  Selenium has also been shown to support the immune system by promoting the production of killer T-cells (a type of white blood cell), which engulf and destroy harmful foreign substances that enter the body and could otherwise cause disease and infection.  Selenium works in close conjunction with vitamin E as an antioxidant to prevent the formation of free radicals which can weaken and damage cells in every organ system. 

In addition, research has shown that selenium is an essential component of the thyroid gland’s functions, helping to regulate the amount of the thyroid hormone T3 that is produced within the body – without selenium the T3 hormone cannot be produced which can be catastrophic to a wide variety of your body’s systems.  It is believed that good selenium intake can help to prevent hair loss and promote shiny hair and healthy nail growthBrazil nuts are the richest source of selenium discovered so far, also found in mushrooms, shellfish, garlic, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, selenium is destroyed when foods are refined or processed so eating a variety of whole, unprocessed foods is the best way to get selenium into your diet.

Selenium contributes to:

·         normal spermatogenesis

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         normal thyroid function

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

Organic Brown Rice
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 75g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
75
 
Energy KJ/Kcal
1518KJ/357Kcal
1139KJ/268Kcal
13.55%
Fat
2.8g
2.1g
3.00%
of which saturates
0.6g
0.5g
 
Carbohydrate
81.3g
61.0g
23.45%
of which sugars
1.3g
1.0g
1.08%
Protein
6.7g
5.0g
10.05%
Dietary Fibre
3.8g
2.9g
 
Salt
7.00mg
5.25mg
0.09%
Manganese
0.90mg
0.68mg
33.75%
Selenium
0.01mg
0.01mg
13.36%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult
  • Certified Organic by The Organic Food Federation
  • Produced to GMP standards
  • Quality Assured by Indigo Herbs
  • Suitable for vegetarians and vegans
  • Gluten free
  • Re-sealable air tight, foil pouch
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added

Our Organic Brown Rice is grown in certified organic land. After it is reaped it is left in the field to dry naturally under the sun. It is then threshed to separate the grain from the rest of the crop before it goes on for cleaning – removing immature, unfilled, non-grain materials. The rice is then thoroughly tested for heavy metals and foreign particles before being packed and made ready for shipment. 

May cause bloating if consumed in large amounts

Buy Lentils Dark Speckled Organic 1kg from Indigo Herbs

Latin Name: Lens culinaris

  • Certified Organic
  • High in Plant Protein
  • High Fibre
  • Support Digestive Health
  • Resealable Airtight Pouch
  • 100% Pure Botanical Ingredients
£5.99
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

  • Contraindications

Dark Speckled Lentils, organic, dried and ready to soak from Indigo Herbs. Dark Speckled Lentils are a type of green lentil although have a textured darker colour with speckles. They are also known as Le Puy Lentils although le puy are grown specifically in the region of France with the same name. Our Organic Dark Speckled Lentils hold their form well when cooked although when cooked longer than 30 minutes they can become more mushy. Try our Organic Dark Speckled Lentils in curries, side dishes or cold salads.

Our Organic Dark Speckled Lentils are similar to Puy and Green Lentils in texture, however the colour can vary from brown to almost black. They have a lovely earthy flavour and also keep a firm texture after cooking. Lentils are a great source of protein and an indispensable ingredient in curries and cooking from the Indian subcontinent.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality Wholefoods. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and well being, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals and Superfoods.

Also known as: Dark Speckled Lentils

Lentils are extremely high in plant based protein. However, whilst this protein isn't complete, simply mixing them with grains such as rice, barley, rye or oats act as complementary proteins and supply the amino acids such as cysteine and methionine that lentils lack. Proteins are the main building blocks of the body used to make muscles, tendons, organs and skin. They are also used to make enzymes, hormones, neurotransmitters and various tiny molecules that serve various functions.

Dark Speckled Lentils are high in many important nutrients that are essential to bone health. Phosphorus, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Copper and Manganese all contribute to building and maintaining bone structure and strength - Iron and Zinc play a crucial role in maintaining the strength and elasticity of bones. With 60% of the body's Magnesium and 80% of Phosphorus stored in the bones, it is very important to get sufficient amounts of these nutrients from natural, organic food. 

Also important for heart health, Speckled Lentil's Fibre, Folate, Potassium and Vitamin B6 content all support a healthy heart. Vitamin B6 and Folate prevent the build up of a compound called homocysteine. Excessive homocysteine levels can damage blood vessels and lead to heart problems when left unchecked. 

Lentils are high in the little known Vitamin B5, or Pantothenic Acid. This nutrient is helpful in reducing body fatigue and weariness and it sets the metabolic process of the entire body on the right track, making it capable of increasing the stamina of the human body. 

These delicate, peppery flavoured lentils retain a firm texture after cooking if not overcooked. 

To Cook:

No pre-soaking needed. Wash and rinse well, add plenty of cold water and bring to the boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes or until tender, drain and add to your favourite recipe.

HIGH IN
Protein
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High in Protein

Proteins are a group of biological compounds which are present in every live cell, organ and tissue of the body.  Meaning “first” or “of prime importance” in Greek, proteins participate in every cellular process occurring in the body.  Proteins are made up of structures called amino acids, there are a total of 21 amino acids, 9 are essential, the rest are nonessential – you must consume the essential amino acids in your diet because your body cannot make them. 

Dietary protein supports bone health in three main ways: by supplying the raw material required to construct soft bone matrix, by increasing plasma IGF1 and by promoting muscle growth and retention.  IGF1 is a growth hormone that stimulates and increases the activity of osteoblasts (cells which secrete the substance of bone).  It is especially important to ensure that children get enough protein since they are still developing and it is necessary to ensure their growth is unimpaired.  Proteins play an important role in muscle contraction and coordination, they are present in the muscle tissues in the form of many microfilaments and provide muscle structure.  Muscle growth depends on the adequacy of proteins in the body.  Proteins function as building blocks for muscles, bones and cartilage, opt for a variety of whole foods to meet your protein needs including; grass fed meat and poultry, eggs, dairy, seeds, beans and nuts.

Protein contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         a growth in muscle mass

·         the maintenance of muscle mass

·         Protein is needed for normal growth and development of bone in children.

HIGH IN
Dietary Fibre
HIGH IN
Vitamin B1
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High in Vitamin B1

Also known as thiamin, vitamin B1 is one of the eight water soluble vitamins in the vitamin B family.  It is a vital human nutrient playing an important role in how we convert our food into energy – when we consume our food it is broken down into simpler units such as carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, vitamin B1 plays a crucial role in utilising these units to produce energy.  This is especially true for cells in the brain where the energy demand is really high which is why it is also referred to as a “morale vitamin” for its positive effect on the nervous system and a healthy mental attitude! 

Promoting the health of the nervous system, vitamin B1 helps in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress, it is often called the “anti-stress” vitamin and is also reported to improve the memory and powers of concentration.  Thiamin is essential to the body’s cardiac heath, involved in blood formation and helping in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is used to relay messages between the nerves and muscles to ensure proper cardiac function.  Brewer’s yeast and liver are the richest sources of vitamin B1, however, spirulina, linseeds, rye, wheat germ and kidney beans are also important sources of this vitamin.

Vitamin B1 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the normal function of the heart

HIGH IN
Vitamin B6
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High in Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, plays an essential role in human life and is the most versatile of all the B vitamins!  Working closely with the other B vitamins, vitamin B6 contributes to numerous functions in the body.  It plays an important role in refurbishing the immune system to the required functional level, this potential health benefit appears to be associated with its role in the metabolism of the amino acid tryptophan.  Also referred to as the “mood vitamin”, B6 is needed for proper brain development and function, preventing mental fatigue and helping the body make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine that relax and lift your spirits, along with melatonin, the hormone which regulates the body clock. 

Vitamin B6 is functional in working with a number of enzymatic systems to make these enzymes work in the desired manner, this association contributes to the proper functioning of the nervous system.  It is also involved at several steps in the metabolism of carbohydrates, in particular the enzyme that pulls carbohydrates out of storage in the cell - in the form of a molecule called glycogen – which requires vitamin B6 for its activity and it metabolises a number of other nutrients to extract energy.  Vitamin B6 is a key factor in the manufacture of haemoglobin – the oxygen carrying component of red blood cells – and has a role in preventing heart disease.  Without enough B6 a compound called homocysteine builds up in the body which can damage blood vessel linings, setting the stage for plaque build-up when the body tries to heal the damage.  Vitamin B6 prevents this build-up thereby reducing the risk of heart attack.  The availability of this important vitamin is highest in foods like spirulina, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, green beans, walnuts and wheat germ.

Vitamin B6 contributes to:

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal homocysteine metabolism

·         normal protein and glycogen metabolism

·         normal psychological function

·         normal red blood cell formation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         the regulation of hormonal activity

·         normal cysteine synthesis

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Folate
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High in Folate

Folate – the naturally occurring vitamin B9 – is often confused with folic acid.  Folic acid is a synthetically derived molecule created in a German laboratory in the 1940s and does not occur naturally in food.  Needless to say, folate metabolizes faster in the body and any excess is excreted through the urine whereas folic acid can accumulate in the blood and may adversely affect immune cell function.  Nature knows best when it comes to nutrition!  Folate is probably the vitamin whose essential role in pregnancy is most widely known.  It is necessary for the production of new DNA which is needed for the production of new cells – the growing life within the womb engages in constant cell division and the mother must expand her blood supply with the production of new red blood cells – these activities demand a generous supply of folate. 

Folate works to convert the amino acid homocysteine into methionine - a deficiency allows homocysteine levels to accumulate in the body.  High levels of homocysteine are associated with heart disease and stroke and can block blood and other nutrients from reaching the brain, interfering with the production of the feel good hormones serotonin and dopamine which regulate mood.  Within the body, folate is an activator – it has an influence on “natural killer” cells of the immune system which are in charge of fighting infections and malignant cells.  Romaine lettuce, spinach and asparagus are especially high in folate; other good sources include egg yolks, legumes and lentils.

Folate contributes to:

  • maternal tissue growth during pregnancy
  • normal amino acid synthesis
  • normal blood formation
  • normal homocysteine metabolism
  • normal psychological function
  • the normal function of the immune system
  • the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
  • Folate has a role in the process of cell division
HIGH IN
Pantothenic Acid
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High in Pantothenic Acid

Also called vitamin B5, pantothenic acid gets its name from the Greek root pantos meaning “everywhere” as it can be found throughout all living cells.  The most studied role of pantothenic acid in health support is its incorporation into a molecule called coenzyme A (CoA), this occupies a central place in energy metabolism, acting to allow carbohydrates, fats and proteins to be burned as energy sources.  It is also helpful in reducing body fatigue and weariness and it sets the metabolic process of the entire body on the right track making it capable of increasing the stamina of the human body. 

Sometimes referred to as the “anti-stress” vitamin, pantothenic acid may help to encourage the production of dopamine and serotonin which are neurotransmitter chemicals that regulate mood and reduce anxiety and stress.  Also aiding in the production of vitamin D, pantothenic acid supports the adrenal gland which produces steroid hormones and generally keeps the gland in optimal health.  Given the critical role it plays in health it’s a good thing that pantothenic acid is so ubiquitous in wholefoods with shiitake mushrooms providing the richest natural source of this essential nutrient, closely followed by cauliflower, sweet potato and broccoli.

Pantothenic acid contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal mental performance

·         normal synthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones, Vitamin D and some neurotransmitters

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

HIGH IN
Potassium
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High in Potassium

Potassium, the third most abundant mineral in the human body, is an essential mineral whose ions are vital for the functioning of all living cells!  Potassium plays a role at both the cellular and electrical level – considered and electrolyte because it carries a tiny electrical charge – it is found in red blood cells, muscles and bones.  Our bodies use potassium ions to conduct electrical impulses along muscle and nerve cells, it helps to boost the efficiency of nerve reflexes that transmit messages from one body part to another, this in turn helps in muscle contraction to perform various activities without tiring quickly. 

Potassium also has vasodilating properties that work to relieve the tension of blood vessels which is one of the main causes of high blood pressure.  It is helpful in reversing the role of sodium in unbalancing normal blood pressure thus acting as a vital component that maintains the normality of blood pressure in the human body.  The importance of potassium should not be underestimated in your dietary plan, most famously found in bananas other rich sources of potassium include spinach, avocados and coconut water.

Potassium contributes to:

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         the maintenance of normal blood pressure

HIGH IN
Phosphorus
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High in Phosphorus

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body.  In order to be properly utilised it must be in proper balance with calcium and magnesium in the blood, these are the two minerals it works in tandem with to create strong bones and teeth, also helping to lay the foundation of a strong skeletal structure.  It is an essential part of our diet - especially as children when the most bone growth and development occurs.  Both DNA and RNA contain phosphorus which make it important for cellular reproduction. 

Phosphorus also contributes to the repair process and maintenance of various body cells which suffer from daily wear and tear, it makes up part of the phospholipids that surround cells - phospholipids help to protect and regulate what goes in and out of each cell.  Phosphorus plays an essential role in how the body stores and uses energy, it aids in the process of energy extraction by stimulating the process of metabolism of different nutrients including niacin(B3) and riboflavin(B2), helping to maximise the uptake of these two vitamins in particular.  The best sources for this mineral are chlorella, dairy, whole grains, legumes and nuts.

Phosphorus contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         the normal growth and development of bone in children

·         the normal function of cell membranes

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Magnesium
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High in Magnesium

The importance of magnesium ions for all life itself, as well as for overall vibrant health, is hard to overstate.  Frequently referred to as the “miracle mineral”, magnesium is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions involving the creation of energy and its transport, the creation and synthesis of proteins and is involved in literally hundreds of enzymatic reactions - it activates the enzymes that make copies of DNA and RNA making it essential in the process of cell division. 

Roughly half of your body’s magnesium is stored in your bones and acts as a cofactor with calcium and vitamin D to maintain and strengthen the bone structure and teeth (your teeth can only form hard enamel from calcium if magnesium is available).  It also works, again in concert with calcium, to regulate electrical impulses in the cells.  Cellular calcium channels allow the mineral to enter the cell only as long as needed to conduct an impulse, it is ushered out immediately by magnesium once its task is fulfilled, operating as a natural calcium channel blocker and responsible for relaxation, magnesium is pivotally important to the functioning of the parasympathetic nervous system.  Both magnesium and calcium are intimately involved with muscle function (magnesium relaxes, calcium contracts) with frequent muscle cramps being a symptom of a deficiency in magnesium.  If magnesium is severely deficient, the brain is particularly affected as magnesium is crucial to the production of neurotransmitters and the integrity of the blood brain barrier and therefore is needed to maintain normal psychological function.  The best food sources of magnesium include; avocados, chia and hemp seeds, sesame seeds, raw cacao and raw chocolate, sprouted nuts/seeds, sea vegetables (such as kelp and nori), raw green vegetables and grass fed dairy products.

Magnesium contributes to:

·         a reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         electrolyte balance

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         normal protein synthesis

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         Magnesium has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Iron
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High in Iron

Iron is needed for a number of highly complex processes that continuously take place in the body on a molecular level and that are indispensable to human life.  Formation of haemoglobin is the chief function of this mineral – this is the primary protein found in red blood cells and represents about two thirds of the body’s iron.  Haemoglobin binds to the oxygen molecules that you breathe in from the air and releases them into your tissues.  The brain receives around 20% of the blood oxygen and a proper flow of blood to the brain can stimulate cognitive activity and help to create new neural pathways, it is especially important that children consume enough iron in their diet – iron deficiency in the first two years of a child’s life is associated with delayed cognitive and psychomotor development.  

Ribonucleic reductase is an iron dependant enzyme that is required for DNA synthesis (cell division), thus iron is required for a number of functions including healing and immune function - red blood cells are necessary for providing oxygen to damaged tissues, organs and cells.  Iron is also involved in food metabolism and is a cofactor and activator for some enzymes which play key roles in energy production and metabolism.  If iron stores are low symptoms can include tiredness, fatigue and dizziness.  Dietary iron has two forms, heme (animal based) and non-heme (plant based), important sources are; grass fed beef, oysters, spinach, lentils and beans.

Iron contributes to:

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin

·         normal oxygen transport in the body

·         normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         normal cognitive development of children

·         Iron has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Zinc
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High in Zinc

Zinc is a metal that functions as an essential nutrient in the body, it is found in every cell and has been used since ancient times, with Ayurvedic texts dating as far back as the 14th century recommending its application in various forms.  Although only required in limited amounts, zinc supports important bodily processes like strengthening the immune system – your body needs zinc to make T-cells, a type of white blood cell that fights off foreign invaders in your bloodstream.  With antioxidant properties, zinc helps to protect the cells in the body from damage by free radicals and supports the catalytic activity of various enzymes essential in DNA synthesis and cell division.  In males, zinc assists in spermatogenesis (the production of mature spermatozoa) and is a critical mineral for robust testosterone levels, in females it aids in all the reproductive phases including the birth and lactation stages. 

Zinc is an essential component of over 300 enzymes participating in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins and other macronutrients and has a regulatory role in vitamin A transport mediated through protein synthesis.  The intake of zinc has a positive influence on bone mass, it is an important cofactor in the stimulation of bone building osteoblasts (cells that synthesize bone), it accelerates the renewal of skin cells and it is essential for healthy nails and shiny hair.  Zinc is vital for vision with high concentrations found in the retina and may also protect from night blindness and prevent the development of cataracts.  This super nutrient also plays a crucial role in memory formation and cognitive stability, ensuring a proper intake of zinc is an important step towards optimal brain function.  Topping the list of zinc rich foods are oysters, however seeds such as chia, sunflower, hemp and pumpkin are also rich sources of this important mineral.

Zinc contributes to:

·         normal DNA synthesis

·         normal acid-base metabolism

·         normal carbohydrate metabolism

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal fertility and reproduction

·         normal macronutrient metabolism

·         normal metabolism of fatty acids

·         normal metabolism of Vitamin A

·         normal protein synthesis

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

HIGH IN
Copper
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High in Copper

An essential trace mineral in the body, copper has long been known to play a role in human health – its use dates back to 400 BC when Hippocrates is said to have employed it as a treatment for a variety of disorders.  Playing a beneficial role in immune function, you need copper for healthy white blood cells – the cell type tasked with seeking out, identifying and destroying pathogens.  Low copper levels lower your white blood count leaving you vulnerable to infection. 

Copper is a vital element of the dark pigment melanin which imparts colouration to the hair and skin, intake of copper is said to protect greying hair.  Copper helps in the absorption of iron from the intestinal tract and releases it from its primary storage sites like the liver.  Also playing a significant role in the synthesis of haemoglobin, myelin and collagen, copper helps to protect the myelin sheath surrounding the nerves and is actively involved in the production of an element of connective tissue, elastin.  Functioning as a coenzyme for energy metabolism from the macronutrients in food we consume, copper enables a normal metabolic process in association with amino acids and vitamins.  Oxidative stress is a characteristic of copper deficiency, when obtained from dietary sources it acts as an antioxidant, getting rid of free radicals which can damage your cells and DNA.  For your body to use copper you need to have a balance of zinc and manganese which is why it is best to obtain your copper from dietary sources where it is already in bioavailable form.  Topping the chart as the best source of copper are oysters!  Closely followed by kale, shitake mushrooms, seeds, nuts and nut butters.

Copper Contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal connective tissues

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal hair pigmentation

·         normal iron transport in the body

·         normal skin pigmentation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

 

 

HIGH IN
Manganese
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High in Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

SOURCE OF
Vitamin B2
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Source of Vitamin B2

Vitamin B2, also known as riboflavin, is a water soluble vitamin.  It is one of the eight B vitamins that are essential for human health and is found in a variety of foods, both plant based and animal based, and is not lost in cooking like many of the other vitamins.  Vitamin B2 is critical to the breakdown of dietary carbohydrates, fats and proteins into energy that you can use.  Without adequate riboflavin in the diet the enzymes involved in energy production do not function optimally which can lead to tiredness and stress. 

Working in tandem with other B vitamins, vitamin B2 helps to protect the nervous system and plays an important role in saving your body from oxidative stress caused by free radicals, serving as a component of the enzyme glutathione reductase which helps to neutralize free radicals.  Essential for the formation of fresh red blood cells, vitamin B2 also interacts with iron which is used to synthesize haemoglobin, allowing your body to get the oxygen rich blood needed to perform the daily functions of life.   Along with vitamin A, riboflavin also helps to maintain the mucous membranes in the digestive system.  Playing a major role in ensuring healthy corneas, perfect vision and radiant skin, vitamin B2 is best consumed as nature intended!  Dietary sources rich in this important vitamin include; dark leafy green vegetables, barleygrass, mushrooms, avocados, dairy products and wild rice.

 

Vitamin B2 contributes to:

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         the maintenance of normal mucous membranes

·         the maintenance of normal red blood cells

·         the maintenance of normal skin

SOURCE OF
Vitamin B3
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Source of Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3, also known as niacin, is an essential nutrient that must be provided for in your diet. The health benefits of niacin are primarily derived from its use in producing a coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or NAD, with one of the most important health benefits being its role in producing energy from dietary carbohydrates and fats.  Vitamin B3 seems to have a particularly potent role in maintaining mental agility and is important for the proper functioning of all cells including the cells of the brain and the nervous system - it acts as a powerful antioxidant in brain cells.  When the nervous system is working properly symptoms such as anxiety and mood swings can be prevented, even a slight deficiency in vitamin B3 can cause physical and mental fatigue. 

The most common symptom of niacin deficiency involves the skin with a severe deficiency leading to dermatitis and a condition called “pellagra” where a thick scaly rash develops in areas exposed to sunlight.  If pellagra is left untreated it can perturb the mucous membranes of the mouth and tongue making them red and swollen.  Vitamin B3 is found abundantly in chia seeds with just 100 grams providing approximately 55% of daily required levels.  Other good sources include sesame and sunflower seeds, nuts and nut butters, capers and brewer’s yeast.

Vitamin B3 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal mucous membranes

·         the maintenance of normal skin

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

SOURCE OF
Selenium
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Source of Selenium

Selenium is an essential trace element that plays an important role in a number of physiological processes in humans.  It is a key element in spermatogenesis (the production or development of mature spermatozoa) and male fertility.  Selenium has also been shown to support the immune system by promoting the production of killer T-cells (a type of white blood cell), which engulf and destroy harmful foreign substances that enter the body and could otherwise cause disease and infection.  Selenium works in close conjunction with vitamin E as an antioxidant to prevent the formation of free radicals which can weaken and damage cells in every organ system. 

In addition, research has shown that selenium is an essential component of the thyroid gland’s functions, helping to regulate the amount of the thyroid hormone T3 that is produced within the body – without selenium the T3 hormone cannot be produced which can be catastrophic to a wide variety of your body’s systems.  It is believed that good selenium intake can help to prevent hair loss and promote shiny hair and healthy nail growthBrazil nuts are the richest source of selenium discovered so far, also found in mushrooms, shellfish, garlic, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, selenium is destroyed when foods are refined or processed so eating a variety of whole, unprocessed foods is the best way to get selenium into your diet.

Selenium contributes to:

·         normal spermatogenesis

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         normal thyroid function

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

Organic Dark Speckled Lentils
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 70g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
70
 
Energy KJ/Kcal
1473KJ/352Kcal
1031KJ/246Kcal
12.28%
Fat
1.1g
0.8g
1.10%
of which saturates
0.1g
0.1g
 
Carbohydrate
52.7g
36.9g
14.19%
of which sugars
2.0g
1.4g
1.56%
Protein
24.6g
17.2g
34.44%
Dietary Fibre
10.7g
7.5g
 
Salt
100.00mg
70.00mg
1.17%
Vitamin B1
0.90mg
0.63mg
57.27%
Vitamin B2
0.21mg
0.15mg
10.50%
Vitamin B3
2.60mg
1.82mg
11.38%
Vitamin B6
0.50mg
0.35mg
25.00%
Folate
0.48mg
0.34mg
167.65%
Pantothenic acid
2.10mg
1.47mg
24.50%
Potassium
955.00mg
668.50mg
33.43%
Phosphorus
451.00mg
315.70mg
45.10%
Magnesium
122.00mg
85.40mg
22.77%
Iron
7.50mg
5.25mg
37.50%
Zinc
4.80mg
3.36mg
33.60%
Copper
0.50mg
0.35mg
35.00%
Manganese
1.30mg
0.91mg
45.50%
Selenium
0.01mg
0.01mg
10.56%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult

Lentils are a staple food on the Indian subcontinent and one of the most popular crops in the world. Lentils are a cool weather crop that's harvested around June - July. These Organic Dark Speckled Lentils are grown on strictly certified organic land and are free from any pesticides or man made fertilisers.

Over consumption of Lentils can lead to flatulence.

Buy Green Lentils Organic 1kg from Indigo Herbs

Latin Name: Lens culinaris

  • Certified Organic
  • High Fibre
  • High in Plant Protein
  • Rich in Minerals
  • Resealable Airtight Pouch
  • 100% Pure Botanical Ingredients
£5.99
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

  • Contraindications

Green Lentils, organic, dried and ready to soak from Indigo Herbs. Lentils have long been a staple of Asian cooking and are well known for their high protein content making them a great food for vegetarians and vegans. Green Lentils in particular have a sometimes mottled green brown colour and a peppery flavour. Generally Green Lentils take a bit longer to cook but retain their shape well and have a firm texture. Try our Organic Green Lentils in salads or side dishes.

Organic Green Lentils from Indigo Herbs come from certified Organic Green Lentil crops. Green Lentils are a classic food staple and essential part of the kitchen for vegans and vegetarians. Lentils are a great source of protein and an indispensable ingredient in curries and cooking from the Indian subcontinent.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality Wholefoods. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and well being, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals and Superfoods.

Also known as: Green Lentils

A portion of Lentils will provide around 33% of your daily Protein needs, which is why they are so popular with vegetarians and vegans as a valuable source of this most important nutrient. Although they are not a complete protein (containing all 9 amino essential amino acids), regular lentils are lacking 2 of these. They can easily be paired up with other proteins, and with a varied diet, you can obtain all of the essential amino acids even if you primarily eat incomplete proteins.

Also packed with other essential nutrients, lentils are exceptionally rich in Folate, an essential B-complex vitamin whose role in a healthy pregnancy is most widely known. It is necessary for the production of new DNA which is needed for the production of new cells – the growing life within the womb engages in constant cell division and the mother must expand her blood supply with the production of new red blood cells – these activities demand a generous supply of Folate. Within the body, Folate is an activator – it has an influence on “natural killer” cells of the immune system which are in charge of fighting infections and malignant cells. One 70g serving of Lentils provides a whopping 63% of the RDA of this important vitamin.

You will also get 21% of your RDA of Copper from a portion of Lentils, this antioxidant mineral acts as a co-factor for the vital enzyme Superoxide Dismutase, a powerful enzyme which boost’s the body’s antioxidant defence by reducing cellular damage.

A source of many other nutrients, Vitamins B1 and B6 will provide immune support and promote proper brain function – regulating the central nervous system, preventing mental fatigue and helping to make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine.

Lentils make a valuable addition to any diet and can be incorporated into many delicious dishes – vegetarian or not - they are tasty, wholesome and nutritionally dense. 

Green lentils should be rinsed in cold water before cooking. Some people prefer to soak lentils overnight. After this initial preparation Green Lentils can cooked by adding three times as much water to a pan and boiling for 35 - 45 minutes. Drain and serve. 

 
HIGH IN
Protein
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High in Protein

Proteins are a group of biological compounds which are present in every live cell, organ and tissue of the body.  Meaning “first” or “of prime importance” in Greek, proteins participate in every cellular process occurring in the body.  Proteins are made up of structures called amino acids, there are a total of 21 amino acids, 9 are essential, the rest are nonessential – you must consume the essential amino acids in your diet because your body cannot make them. 

Dietary protein supports bone health in three main ways: by supplying the raw material required to construct soft bone matrix, by increasing plasma IGF1 and by promoting muscle growth and retention.  IGF1 is a growth hormone that stimulates and increases the activity of osteoblasts (cells which secrete the substance of bone).  It is especially important to ensure that children get enough protein since they are still developing and it is necessary to ensure their growth is unimpaired.  Proteins play an important role in muscle contraction and coordination, they are present in the muscle tissues in the form of many microfilaments and provide muscle structure.  Muscle growth depends on the adequacy of proteins in the body.  Proteins function as building blocks for muscles, bones and cartilage, opt for a variety of whole foods to meet your protein needs including; grass fed meat and poultry, eggs, dairy, seeds, beans and nuts.

Protein contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         a growth in muscle mass

·         the maintenance of muscle mass

·         Protein is needed for normal growth and development of bone in children.

HIGH IN
Vitamin B1
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High in Vitamin B1

Also known as thiamin, vitamin B1 is one of the eight water soluble vitamins in the vitamin B family.  It is a vital human nutrient playing an important role in how we convert our food into energy – when we consume our food it is broken down into simpler units such as carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, vitamin B1 plays a crucial role in utilising these units to produce energy.  This is especially true for cells in the brain where the energy demand is really high which is why it is also referred to as a “morale vitamin” for its positive effect on the nervous system and a healthy mental attitude! 

Promoting the health of the nervous system, vitamin B1 helps in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress, it is often called the “anti-stress” vitamin and is also reported to improve the memory and powers of concentration.  Thiamin is essential to the body’s cardiac heath, involved in blood formation and helping in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is used to relay messages between the nerves and muscles to ensure proper cardiac function.  Brewer’s yeast and liver are the richest sources of vitamin B1, however, spirulina, linseeds, rye, wheat germ and kidney beans are also important sources of this vitamin.

Vitamin B1 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the normal function of the heart

HIGH IN
Vitamin B6
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High in Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, plays an essential role in human life and is the most versatile of all the B vitamins!  Working closely with the other B vitamins, vitamin B6 contributes to numerous functions in the body.  It plays an important role in refurbishing the immune system to the required functional level, this potential health benefit appears to be associated with its role in the metabolism of the amino acid tryptophan.  Also referred to as the “mood vitamin”, B6 is needed for proper brain development and function, preventing mental fatigue and helping the body make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine that relax and lift your spirits, along with melatonin, the hormone which regulates the body clock. 

Vitamin B6 is functional in working with a number of enzymatic systems to make these enzymes work in the desired manner, this association contributes to the proper functioning of the nervous system.  It is also involved at several steps in the metabolism of carbohydrates, in particular the enzyme that pulls carbohydrates out of storage in the cell - in the form of a molecule called glycogen – which requires vitamin B6 for its activity and it metabolises a number of other nutrients to extract energy.  Vitamin B6 is a key factor in the manufacture of haemoglobin – the oxygen carrying component of red blood cells – and has a role in preventing heart disease.  Without enough B6 a compound called homocysteine builds up in the body which can damage blood vessel linings, setting the stage for plaque build-up when the body tries to heal the damage.  Vitamin B6 prevents this build-up thereby reducing the risk of heart attack.  The availability of this important vitamin is highest in foods like spirulina, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, green beans, walnuts and wheat germ.

Vitamin B6 contributes to:

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal homocysteine metabolism

·         normal protein and glycogen metabolism

·         normal psychological function

·         normal red blood cell formation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         the regulation of hormonal activity

·         normal cysteine synthesis

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Folate
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High in Folate

Folate – the naturally occurring vitamin B9 – is often confused with folic acid.  Folic acid is a synthetically derived molecule created in a German laboratory in the 1940s and does not occur naturally in food.  Needless to say, folate metabolizes faster in the body and any excess is excreted through the urine whereas folic acid can accumulate in the blood and may adversely affect immune cell function.  Nature knows best when it comes to nutrition!  Folate is probably the vitamin whose essential role in pregnancy is most widely known.  It is necessary for the production of new DNA which is needed for the production of new cells – the growing life within the womb engages in constant cell division and the mother must expand her blood supply with the production of new red blood cells – these activities demand a generous supply of folate. 

Folate works to convert the amino acid homocysteine into methionine - a deficiency allows homocysteine levels to accumulate in the body.  High levels of homocysteine are associated with heart disease and stroke and can block blood and other nutrients from reaching the brain, interfering with the production of the feel good hormones serotonin and dopamine which regulate mood.  Within the body, folate is an activator – it has an influence on “natural killer” cells of the immune system which are in charge of fighting infections and malignant cells.  Romaine lettuce, spinach and asparagus are especially high in folate; other good sources include egg yolks, legumes and lentils.

Folate contributes to:

  • maternal tissue growth during pregnancy
  • normal amino acid synthesis
  • normal blood formation
  • normal homocysteine metabolism
  • normal psychological function
  • the normal function of the immune system
  • the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
  • Folate has a role in the process of cell division
HIGH IN
Pantothenic Acid
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High in Pantothenic Acid

Also called vitamin B5, pantothenic acid gets its name from the Greek root pantos meaning “everywhere” as it can be found throughout all living cells.  The most studied role of pantothenic acid in health support is its incorporation into a molecule called coenzyme A (CoA), this occupies a central place in energy metabolism, acting to allow carbohydrates, fats and proteins to be burned as energy sources.  It is also helpful in reducing body fatigue and weariness and it sets the metabolic process of the entire body on the right track making it capable of increasing the stamina of the human body. 

Sometimes referred to as the “anti-stress” vitamin, pantothenic acid may help to encourage the production of dopamine and serotonin which are neurotransmitter chemicals that regulate mood and reduce anxiety and stress.  Also aiding in the production of vitamin D, pantothenic acid supports the adrenal gland which produces steroid hormones and generally keeps the gland in optimal health.  Given the critical role it plays in health it’s a good thing that pantothenic acid is so ubiquitous in wholefoods with shiitake mushrooms providing the richest natural source of this essential nutrient, closely followed by cauliflower, sweet potato and broccoli.

Pantothenic acid contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal mental performance

·         normal synthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones, Vitamin D and some neurotransmitters

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

HIGH IN
Potassium
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High in Potassium

Potassium, the third most abundant mineral in the human body, is an essential mineral whose ions are vital for the functioning of all living cells!  Potassium plays a role at both the cellular and electrical level – considered and electrolyte because it carries a tiny electrical charge – it is found in red blood cells, muscles and bones.  Our bodies use potassium ions to conduct electrical impulses along muscle and nerve cells, it helps to boost the efficiency of nerve reflexes that transmit messages from one body part to another, this in turn helps in muscle contraction to perform various activities without tiring quickly. 

Potassium also has vasodilating properties that work to relieve the tension of blood vessels which is one of the main causes of high blood pressure.  It is helpful in reversing the role of sodium in unbalancing normal blood pressure thus acting as a vital component that maintains the normality of blood pressure in the human body.  The importance of potassium should not be underestimated in your dietary plan, most famously found in bananas other rich sources of potassium include spinach, avocados and coconut water.

Potassium contributes to:

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         the maintenance of normal blood pressure

HIGH IN
Phosphorus
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High in Phosphorus

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body.  In order to be properly utilised it must be in proper balance with calcium and magnesium in the blood, these are the two minerals it works in tandem with to create strong bones and teeth, also helping to lay the foundation of a strong skeletal structure.  It is an essential part of our diet - especially as children when the most bone growth and development occurs.  Both DNA and RNA contain phosphorus which make it important for cellular reproduction. 

Phosphorus also contributes to the repair process and maintenance of various body cells which suffer from daily wear and tear, it makes up part of the phospholipids that surround cells - phospholipids help to protect and regulate what goes in and out of each cell.  Phosphorus plays an essential role in how the body stores and uses energy, it aids in the process of energy extraction by stimulating the process of metabolism of different nutrients including niacin(B3) and riboflavin(B2), helping to maximise the uptake of these two vitamins in particular.  The best sources for this mineral are chlorella, dairy, whole grains, legumes and nuts.

Phosphorus contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         the normal growth and development of bone in children

·         the normal function of cell membranes

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Magnesium
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High in Magnesium

The importance of magnesium ions for all life itself, as well as for overall vibrant health, is hard to overstate.  Frequently referred to as the “miracle mineral”, magnesium is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions involving the creation of energy and its transport, the creation and synthesis of proteins and is involved in literally hundreds of enzymatic reactions - it activates the enzymes that make copies of DNA and RNA making it essential in the process of cell division. 

Roughly half of your body’s magnesium is stored in your bones and acts as a cofactor with calcium and vitamin D to maintain and strengthen the bone structure and teeth (your teeth can only form hard enamel from calcium if magnesium is available).  It also works, again in concert with calcium, to regulate electrical impulses in the cells.  Cellular calcium channels allow the mineral to enter the cell only as long as needed to conduct an impulse, it is ushered out immediately by magnesium once its task is fulfilled, operating as a natural calcium channel blocker and responsible for relaxation, magnesium is pivotally important to the functioning of the parasympathetic nervous system.  Both magnesium and calcium are intimately involved with muscle function (magnesium relaxes, calcium contracts) with frequent muscle cramps being a symptom of a deficiency in magnesium.  If magnesium is severely deficient, the brain is particularly affected as magnesium is crucial to the production of neurotransmitters and the integrity of the blood brain barrier and therefore is needed to maintain normal psychological function.  The best food sources of magnesium include; avocados, chia and hemp seeds, sesame seeds, raw cacao and raw chocolate, sprouted nuts/seeds, sea vegetables (such as kelp and nori), raw green vegetables and grass fed dairy products.

Magnesium contributes to:

·         a reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         electrolyte balance

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         normal protein synthesis

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         Magnesium has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Iron
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High in Iron

Iron is needed for a number of highly complex processes that continuously take place in the body on a molecular level and that are indispensable to human life.  Formation of haemoglobin is the chief function of this mineral – this is the primary protein found in red blood cells and represents about two thirds of the body’s iron.  Haemoglobin binds to the oxygen molecules that you breathe in from the air and releases them into your tissues.  The brain receives around 20% of the blood oxygen and a proper flow of blood to the brain can stimulate cognitive activity and help to create new neural pathways, it is especially important that children consume enough iron in their diet – iron deficiency in the first two years of a child’s life is associated with delayed cognitive and psychomotor development.  

Ribonucleic reductase is an iron dependant enzyme that is required for DNA synthesis (cell division), thus iron is required for a number of functions including healing and immune function - red blood cells are necessary for providing oxygen to damaged tissues, organs and cells.  Iron is also involved in food metabolism and is a cofactor and activator for some enzymes which play key roles in energy production and metabolism.  If iron stores are low symptoms can include tiredness, fatigue and dizziness.  Dietary iron has two forms, heme (animal based) and non-heme (plant based), important sources are; grass fed beef, oysters, spinach, lentils and beans.

Iron contributes to:

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin

·         normal oxygen transport in the body

·         normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         normal cognitive development of children

·         Iron has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Zinc
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High in Zinc

Zinc is a metal that functions as an essential nutrient in the body, it is found in every cell and has been used since ancient times, with Ayurvedic texts dating as far back as the 14th century recommending its application in various forms.  Although only required in limited amounts, zinc supports important bodily processes like strengthening the immune system – your body needs zinc to make T-cells, a type of white blood cell that fights off foreign invaders in your bloodstream.  With antioxidant properties, zinc helps to protect the cells in the body from damage by free radicals and supports the catalytic activity of various enzymes essential in DNA synthesis and cell division.  In males, zinc assists in spermatogenesis (the production of mature spermatozoa) and is a critical mineral for robust testosterone levels, in females it aids in all the reproductive phases including the birth and lactation stages. 

Zinc is an essential component of over 300 enzymes participating in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins and other macronutrients and has a regulatory role in vitamin A transport mediated through protein synthesis.  The intake of zinc has a positive influence on bone mass, it is an important cofactor in the stimulation of bone building osteoblasts (cells that synthesize bone), it accelerates the renewal of skin cells and it is essential for healthy nails and shiny hair.  Zinc is vital for vision with high concentrations found in the retina and may also protect from night blindness and prevent the development of cataracts.  This super nutrient also plays a crucial role in memory formation and cognitive stability, ensuring a proper intake of zinc is an important step towards optimal brain function.  Topping the list of zinc rich foods are oysters, however seeds such as chia, sunflower, hemp and pumpkin are also rich sources of this important mineral.

Zinc contributes to:

·         normal DNA synthesis

·         normal acid-base metabolism

·         normal carbohydrate metabolism

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal fertility and reproduction

·         normal macronutrient metabolism

·         normal metabolism of fatty acids

·         normal metabolism of Vitamin A

·         normal protein synthesis

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

HIGH IN
Copper
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High in Copper

An essential trace mineral in the body, copper has long been known to play a role in human health – its use dates back to 400 BC when Hippocrates is said to have employed it as a treatment for a variety of disorders.  Playing a beneficial role in immune function, you need copper for healthy white blood cells – the cell type tasked with seeking out, identifying and destroying pathogens.  Low copper levels lower your white blood count leaving you vulnerable to infection. 

Copper is a vital element of the dark pigment melanin which imparts colouration to the hair and skin, intake of copper is said to protect greying hair.  Copper helps in the absorption of iron from the intestinal tract and releases it from its primary storage sites like the liver.  Also playing a significant role in the synthesis of haemoglobin, myelin and collagen, copper helps to protect the myelin sheath surrounding the nerves and is actively involved in the production of an element of connective tissue, elastin.  Functioning as a coenzyme for energy metabolism from the macronutrients in food we consume, copper enables a normal metabolic process in association with amino acids and vitamins.  Oxidative stress is a characteristic of copper deficiency, when obtained from dietary sources it acts as an antioxidant, getting rid of free radicals which can damage your cells and DNA.  For your body to use copper you need to have a balance of zinc and manganese which is why it is best to obtain your copper from dietary sources where it is already in bioavailable form.  Topping the chart as the best source of copper are oysters!  Closely followed by kale, shitake mushrooms, seeds, nuts and nut butters.

Copper Contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal connective tissues

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal hair pigmentation

·         normal iron transport in the body

·         normal skin pigmentation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

 

 

HIGH IN
Manganese
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High in Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

SOURCE OF
Dietary Fibre
SOURCE OF
Vitamin B2
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Source of Vitamin B2

Vitamin B2, also known as riboflavin, is a water soluble vitamin.  It is one of the eight B vitamins that are essential for human health and is found in a variety of foods, both plant based and animal based, and is not lost in cooking like many of the other vitamins.  Vitamin B2 is critical to the breakdown of dietary carbohydrates, fats and proteins into energy that you can use.  Without adequate riboflavin in the diet the enzymes involved in energy production do not function optimally which can lead to tiredness and stress. 

Working in tandem with other B vitamins, vitamin B2 helps to protect the nervous system and plays an important role in saving your body from oxidative stress caused by free radicals, serving as a component of the enzyme glutathione reductase which helps to neutralize free radicals.  Essential for the formation of fresh red blood cells, vitamin B2 also interacts with iron which is used to synthesize haemoglobin, allowing your body to get the oxygen rich blood needed to perform the daily functions of life.   Along with vitamin A, riboflavin also helps to maintain the mucous membranes in the digestive system.  Playing a major role in ensuring healthy corneas, perfect vision and radiant skin, vitamin B2 is best consumed as nature intended!  Dietary sources rich in this important vitamin include; dark leafy green vegetables, barleygrass, mushrooms, avocados, dairy products and wild rice.

 

Vitamin B2 contributes to:

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         the maintenance of normal mucous membranes

·         the maintenance of normal red blood cells

·         the maintenance of normal skin

SOURCE OF
Vitamin B3
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Source of Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3, also known as niacin, is an essential nutrient that must be provided for in your diet. The health benefits of niacin are primarily derived from its use in producing a coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or NAD, with one of the most important health benefits being its role in producing energy from dietary carbohydrates and fats.  Vitamin B3 seems to have a particularly potent role in maintaining mental agility and is important for the proper functioning of all cells including the cells of the brain and the nervous system - it acts as a powerful antioxidant in brain cells.  When the nervous system is working properly symptoms such as anxiety and mood swings can be prevented, even a slight deficiency in vitamin B3 can cause physical and mental fatigue. 

The most common symptom of niacin deficiency involves the skin with a severe deficiency leading to dermatitis and a condition called “pellagra” where a thick scaly rash develops in areas exposed to sunlight.  If pellagra is left untreated it can perturb the mucous membranes of the mouth and tongue making them red and swollen.  Vitamin B3 is found abundantly in chia seeds with just 100 grams providing approximately 55% of daily required levels.  Other good sources include sesame and sunflower seeds, nuts and nut butters, capers and brewer’s yeast.

Vitamin B3 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal mucous membranes

·         the maintenance of normal skin

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

SOURCE OF
Selenium
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Source of Selenium

Selenium is an essential trace element that plays an important role in a number of physiological processes in humans.  It is a key element in spermatogenesis (the production or development of mature spermatozoa) and male fertility.  Selenium has also been shown to support the immune system by promoting the production of killer T-cells (a type of white blood cell), which engulf and destroy harmful foreign substances that enter the body and could otherwise cause disease and infection.  Selenium works in close conjunction with vitamin E as an antioxidant to prevent the formation of free radicals which can weaken and damage cells in every organ system. 

In addition, research has shown that selenium is an essential component of the thyroid gland’s functions, helping to regulate the amount of the thyroid hormone T3 that is produced within the body – without selenium the T3 hormone cannot be produced which can be catastrophic to a wide variety of your body’s systems.  It is believed that good selenium intake can help to prevent hair loss and promote shiny hair and healthy nail growthBrazil nuts are the richest source of selenium discovered so far, also found in mushrooms, shellfish, garlic, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, selenium is destroyed when foods are refined or processed so eating a variety of whole, unprocessed foods is the best way to get selenium into your diet.

Selenium contributes to:

·         normal spermatogenesis

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         normal thyroid function

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

Organic Green Lentils
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 70g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
70
 
Energy KJ
1353KJ/318Kcal
947KJ/223Kcal
11.28%
Fat
1.3g
0.9g
1.30%
of which saturates
0.2g
0.1g
 
Carbohydrate
56.3g
39.4g
15.16%
of which sugars
1.2g
0.8g
0.93%
Protein
23.8g
16.7g
33.32%
Dietary Fibre
4.9g
3.4g
 
Salt
90.00mg
63.00mg
1.05%
Vitamin B1
0.90mg
0.63mg
57.27%
Vitamin B2
0.21mg
0.15mg
10.50%
Vitamin B3
2.60mg
1.82mg
11.38%
Vitamin B6
0.50mg
0.35mg
25.00%
Folate
0.48mg
0.34mg
167.65%
Pantothenic acid
2.10mg
1.47mg
24.50%
Potassium
955.00mg
668.50mg
33.43%
Phosphorus
451.00mg
315.70mg
45.10%
Magnesium
122.00mg
85.40mg
22.77%
Iron
7.50mg
5.25mg
37.50%
Zinc
4.80mg
3.36mg
33.60%
Copper
0.50mg
0.35mg
35.00%
Manganese
1.30mg
0.91mg
45.50%
Selenium
0.01mg
0.01mg
10.56%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult

Lentils are a staple food on the Indian subcontinent and one of the most popular crops in the world. Lentils are a cool weather crop that's harvested around June - July. These Organic Green Lentils are grown on strictly certified organic land and are free from any pesticides or man made fertilisers.

Over consumption of Lentils can lead to flatulence.

Buy Organic Alfalfa Seeds 250g from Indigo Herbs
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Latin Name: Medicago sativa

  • Certified Organic
  • A wholesome and cleansing food
  • A long history of use throughout the world
  • Re-sealable air tight, foil pouch
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added
£4.99-£16.99
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • How to use

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

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Organic Alfalfa Seeds from Indigo Herbs are a great quality Alfalfa seed coming from 100% pure, organic, premium quality Medicago sativa stock. Organic Alfalfa Seeds can be taken daily and is a nutrient rich whole food.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality botanicals. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and wellbeing, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals.

Also known as: Lucerne, Luzerne, Buffalo Herb, Erba Medica, Chilean Clover, Lucerne Grass.

Our Wholefoods are 100% pure and unprocessed with nothing added. They are simple and easy to integrate into your daily diet. Seeds can be roasted or soaked and sprouted. Nuts can be made into nut milk, nut butter or snacked upon. Fruits can flavour a cake, bread or biscuits, or make a great topping to breakfast cereal.

Nuts, seeds and dried fruit all make great ingredients for a superfood snack trail mix, and can supply essential daily nutrients whilst being delicious and satisfying. For full instructions go to our How to use Wholefoods page.

Alfalfa seeds can be used in food preparation, and to top salads and soups. They can also be sprouted and used to make a tea.

Serving:

A daily serving can be anywhere between 10 and thirty grams.

1 teaspoon equals 3 grams (1 tsp = 3g)
HIGH IN
Protein
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High in Protein

Proteins are a group of biological compounds which are present in every live cell, organ and tissue of the body.  Meaning “first” or “of prime importance” in Greek, proteins participate in every cellular process occurring in the body.  Proteins are made up of structures called amino acids, there are a total of 21 amino acids, 9 are essential, the rest are nonessential – you must consume the essential amino acids in your diet because your body cannot make them. 

Dietary protein supports bone health in three main ways: by supplying the raw material required to construct soft bone matrix, by increasing plasma IGF1 and by promoting muscle growth and retention.  IGF1 is a growth hormone that stimulates and increases the activity of osteoblasts (cells which secrete the substance of bone).  It is especially important to ensure that children get enough protein since they are still developing and it is necessary to ensure their growth is unimpaired.  Proteins play an important role in muscle contraction and coordination, they are present in the muscle tissues in the form of many microfilaments and provide muscle structure.  Muscle growth depends on the adequacy of proteins in the body.  Proteins function as building blocks for muscles, bones and cartilage, opt for a variety of whole foods to meet your protein needs including; grass fed meat and poultry, eggs, dairy, seeds, beans and nuts.

Protein contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         a growth in muscle mass

·         the maintenance of muscle mass

·         Protein is needed for normal growth and development of bone in children.

HIGH IN
Vitamin K
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High in Vitamin K

Vitamin K is a fat soluble vitamin which is best known for its role in helping your blood to clot or coagulate properly by helping to form the proteins necessary for your bloods clotting factor.  The K comes from its German name “Koagulations” vitamin. 

There are two types of naturally occurring vitamin K; vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) which is found naturally in plants and vitamin K2 (menaquinone) which is made by the bacteria that line your gastrointestinal tract.  For proper bone growth and maintenance your body uses multiple vitamins, however, vitamin K and vitamin D work in tandem to produce a protein (osteocalcin) necessary for bones, without this protein minerals could not bind together to form the density of the bones.  Fermented foods, such as natto, typically have the highest concentrations of vitamin K found in the human diet followed by alfalfa seeds and dark leafy greens such as spinach, kale and cabbage.

Vitamin K contributes to:

·         normal blood clotting

·         the maintenance of normal bones

SOURCE OF
Folate
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Source of Folate

Folate – the naturally occurring vitamin B9 – is often confused with folic acid.  Folic acid is a synthetically derived molecule created in a German laboratory in the 1940s and does not occur naturally in food.  Needless to say, folate metabolizes faster in the body and any excess is excreted through the urine whereas folic acid can accumulate in the blood and may adversely affect immune cell function.  Nature knows best when it comes to nutrition!  Folate is probably the vitamin whose essential role in pregnancy is most widely known.  It is necessary for the production of new DNA which is needed for the production of new cells – the growing life within the womb engages in constant cell division and the mother must expand her blood supply with the production of new red blood cells – these activities demand a generous supply of folate. 

Folate works to convert the amino acid homocysteine into methionine - a deficiency allows homocysteine levels to accumulate in the body.  High levels of homocysteine are associated with heart disease and stroke and can block blood and other nutrients from reaching the brain, interfering with the production of the feel good hormones serotonin and dopamine which regulate mood.  Within the body, folate is an activator – it has an influence on “natural killer” cells of the immune system which are in charge of fighting infections and malignant cells.  Romaine lettuce, spinach and asparagus are especially high in folate; other good sources include egg yolks, legumes and lentils.

Folate contributes to:

  • maternal tissue growth during pregnancy
  • normal amino acid synthesis
  • normal blood formation
  • normal homocysteine metabolism
  • normal psychological function
  • the normal function of the immune system
  • the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
  • Folate has a role in the process of cell division
Alfalfa Seeds
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 30g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
30
 
Energy KJ/ Kcal
130KJ/31Kcal
39KJ/9Kcal
0.46%
Fat
0.7g
0.21g
0.30%
of which saturates
0g
0g
 
Carbohydrate
2.1g
0.63g
0.24%
of which sugars
0.2g
0.06g
 
Protein
4g
1.2g
2.40%
Dietary Fibre
1.9g
0.57g
 
Salt
0mg
0mg
0.00%
Vitamin K
0.03mg
0.01mg
12.20%
Folate
0.04mg
0.01mg
5.40%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult
  • Certified Organic by The Organic Food Federation.
  • Produced to GMP standards.
  • Quality Assured by Indigo Herbs.
  • Suitable for vegetarians and vegans.
  • Gluten free.
  • Re-sealable air tight, foil pouch.
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added.

Manufacture Process

Indigo Herbs Organic Alfalfa Seeds come from Canada where they are grown and processed. As a field crop this plant is grown in soil that is certified organic and is checked regularly to comply with strict organic regulations. Most of the process of harvest and seed separation is mechanical from start to finish which guarantees a regulated process. None of these seeds are treated in any way and they come to you in an absolute pure form.

Can cause bloating in large amounts.

Organic Alfalfa Seeds

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5.0 / 5 (2)
one year ago
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the seeds are sprouting quickly
2 years ago
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Love this product, have it every morning - has really helped my digestion! Tastes great, thank you!
Buy Organic Quinoa Grains Black 1kg from Indigo Herbs

Latin Name: Chenopodium quinoa

  • Certified Organic
  • Black Quinoa - Crunchier Texture than the white variety
  • Highly Nutritious Seed
  • Subtle nutty flavour
  • High in Minerals & a source of Protein
  • Resealable air tight, foil pouch
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added
£9.99
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • How to use

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

  • Contraindications

  • Blogs

  • Recipes

Black Quinoa Grain from Indigo Herbs is Organic, dark coloured, and differs from the normal white variety having a crunchier texture. Organic Black Quinoa comes in larger sizes giving you the best quality and price. Black Quinoa is derived from a highly nutritious seed that has become incredibly popular as a source of fibre, protein and minerals. Why not try replacing rice with our Organic Black Quinoa Grain for a highly nutritious meal.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality Wholefoods. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and wellbeing, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals and Superfoods.

These highly nutritious seeds are an extremely rich source of many important nutrients. Vitamins B1, B2 and Folate (B9) work together to ensure optimum digestion, Vitamin B1 is essential to the production of hydrochloric acid – without which we would be unable to digest food consumed. It also exerts a positive effect on the brain and central nervous system – B1 assists the proper development of the myelin sheaths surrounding nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress. B2 is a powerful brain antioxidant, serving as a component of glutathione – an important antioxidant serving in cellular defence, allowing the body to prevent and fight infections and disease. It is also reliant on a plentiful supply of Selenium and Vitamin E to function properly within the body, Quinoa is a source of these two antioxidant nutrients.

Also a fabulous source of many minerals, Quinoa is high in Magnesium – a crucial mineral for overall vibrant health. It is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions including the creation and transport of energy and the creation and synthesis of proteins. It is also high in Phosphorus, the most abundant mineral in the body and essential for strong bones and teeth. Zinc, Copper and Manganese work together to keep the immune system working to optimum capacity, involved in various processes including the production of T-cells – white blood cells that are deployed to fight off foreign invaders in the bloodstream.

Although it is only a source of Protein, Quinoa is one of the few plants that is a complete protein, providing all of the amino acids our bodies cannot make. Meaning “of prime importance” in Greek, Proteins participate in every cellular process occurring in the body. They are the main building blocks of the body used to make muscles, tendons, organs and skin. One 50g serving of Quinoa will provide you with around 7g of high quality plant protein. 

Our Wholefoods are 100% pure and unprocessed with nothing added. They are simple and easy to integrate into your daily diet. Seeds can be roasted or soaked and sprouted. Nuts can be made into nut milk, nut butter or snacked upon. Fruits can flavour a cake, bread or biscuits, or make a great topping to breakfast cereal.

Nuts, seeds and dried fruit all make great ingredients for a superfood snack trail mix, and can supply essential daily nutrients whilst being delicious and satisfying. For full instructions go to our How to use Wholefoods page.

Quinoa can be cooked and served much like rice.

  1. Prepare our Organic Quinoa by rinsing with cold running water before cooking
  2. Add to a pan with roughly double the amount of salted water
  3. Using a medium heat bring to the boil
  4. Once boiling, turn down the heat and simmer
  5. Leave for 10 - 15 minutes until water has been absorbed and Quinoa is tender

After cooking, Quinoa can be added to stir fry, cold salads and can even be used for baking cakes.

HIGH IN
Dietary Fibre
HIGH IN
Vitamin B1
more info...
High in Vitamin B1

Also known as thiamin, vitamin B1 is one of the eight water soluble vitamins in the vitamin B family.  It is a vital human nutrient playing an important role in how we convert our food into energy – when we consume our food it is broken down into simpler units such as carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, vitamin B1 plays a crucial role in utilising these units to produce energy.  This is especially true for cells in the brain where the energy demand is really high which is why it is also referred to as a “morale vitamin” for its positive effect on the nervous system and a healthy mental attitude! 

Promoting the health of the nervous system, vitamin B1 helps in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress, it is often called the “anti-stress” vitamin and is also reported to improve the memory and powers of concentration.  Thiamin is essential to the body’s cardiac heath, involved in blood formation and helping in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is used to relay messages between the nerves and muscles to ensure proper cardiac function.  Brewer’s yeast and liver are the richest sources of vitamin B1, however, spirulina, linseeds, rye, wheat germ and kidney beans are also important sources of this vitamin.

Vitamin B1 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the normal function of the heart

HIGH IN
Folate
more info...
High in Folate

Folate – the naturally occurring vitamin B9 – is often confused with folic acid.  Folic acid is a synthetically derived molecule created in a German laboratory in the 1940s and does not occur naturally in food.  Needless to say, folate metabolizes faster in the body and any excess is excreted through the urine whereas folic acid can accumulate in the blood and may adversely affect immune cell function.  Nature knows best when it comes to nutrition!  Folate is probably the vitamin whose essential role in pregnancy is most widely known.  It is necessary for the production of new DNA which is needed for the production of new cells – the growing life within the womb engages in constant cell division and the mother must expand her blood supply with the production of new red blood cells – these activities demand a generous supply of folate. 

Folate works to convert the amino acid homocysteine into methionine - a deficiency allows homocysteine levels to accumulate in the body.  High levels of homocysteine are associated with heart disease and stroke and can block blood and other nutrients from reaching the brain, interfering with the production of the feel good hormones serotonin and dopamine which regulate mood.  Within the body, folate is an activator – it has an influence on “natural killer” cells of the immune system which are in charge of fighting infections and malignant cells.  Romaine lettuce, spinach and asparagus are especially high in folate; other good sources include egg yolks, legumes and lentils.

Folate contributes to:

  • maternal tissue growth during pregnancy
  • normal amino acid synthesis
  • normal blood formation
  • normal homocysteine metabolism
  • normal psychological function
  • the normal function of the immune system
  • the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
  • Folate has a role in the process of cell division
HIGH IN
Phosphorus
more info...
High in Phosphorus

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body.  In order to be properly utilised it must be in proper balance with calcium and magnesium in the blood, these are the two minerals it works in tandem with to create strong bones and teeth, also helping to lay the foundation of a strong skeletal structure.  It is an essential part of our diet - especially as children when the most bone growth and development occurs.  Both DNA and RNA contain phosphorus which make it important for cellular reproduction. 

Phosphorus also contributes to the repair process and maintenance of various body cells which suffer from daily wear and tear, it makes up part of the phospholipids that surround cells - phospholipids help to protect and regulate what goes in and out of each cell.  Phosphorus plays an essential role in how the body stores and uses energy, it aids in the process of energy extraction by stimulating the process of metabolism of different nutrients including niacin(B3) and riboflavin(B2), helping to maximise the uptake of these two vitamins in particular.  The best sources for this mineral are chlorella, dairy, whole grains, legumes and nuts.

Phosphorus contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         the normal growth and development of bone in children

·         the normal function of cell membranes

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Magnesium
more info...
High in Magnesium

The importance of magnesium ions for all life itself, as well as for overall vibrant health, is hard to overstate.  Frequently referred to as the “miracle mineral”, magnesium is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions involving the creation of energy and its transport, the creation and synthesis of proteins and is involved in literally hundreds of enzymatic reactions - it activates the enzymes that make copies of DNA and RNA making it essential in the process of cell division. 

Roughly half of your body’s magnesium is stored in your bones and acts as a cofactor with calcium and vitamin D to maintain and strengthen the bone structure and teeth (your teeth can only form hard enamel from calcium if magnesium is available).  It also works, again in concert with calcium, to regulate electrical impulses in the cells.  Cellular calcium channels allow the mineral to enter the cell only as long as needed to conduct an impulse, it is ushered out immediately by magnesium once its task is fulfilled, operating as a natural calcium channel blocker and responsible for relaxation, magnesium is pivotally important to the functioning of the parasympathetic nervous system.  Both magnesium and calcium are intimately involved with muscle function (magnesium relaxes, calcium contracts) with frequent muscle cramps being a symptom of a deficiency in magnesium.  If magnesium is severely deficient, the brain is particularly affected as magnesium is crucial to the production of neurotransmitters and the integrity of the blood brain barrier and therefore is needed to maintain normal psychological function.  The best food sources of magnesium include; avocados, chia and hemp seeds, sesame seeds, raw cacao and raw chocolate, sprouted nuts/seeds, sea vegetables (such as kelp and nori), raw green vegetables and grass fed dairy products.

Magnesium contributes to:

·         a reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         electrolyte balance

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         normal protein synthesis

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         Magnesium has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Iron
more info...
High in Iron

Iron is needed for a number of highly complex processes that continuously take place in the body on a molecular level and that are indispensable to human life.  Formation of haemoglobin is the chief function of this mineral – this is the primary protein found in red blood cells and represents about two thirds of the body’s iron.  Haemoglobin binds to the oxygen molecules that you breathe in from the air and releases them into your tissues.  The brain receives around 20% of the blood oxygen and a proper flow of blood to the brain can stimulate cognitive activity and help to create new neural pathways, it is especially important that children consume enough iron in their diet – iron deficiency in the first two years of a child’s life is associated with delayed cognitive and psychomotor development.  

Ribonucleic reductase is an iron dependant enzyme that is required for DNA synthesis (cell division), thus iron is required for a number of functions including healing and immune function - red blood cells are necessary for providing oxygen to damaged tissues, organs and cells.  Iron is also involved in food metabolism and is a cofactor and activator for some enzymes which play key roles in energy production and metabolism.  If iron stores are low symptoms can include tiredness, fatigue and dizziness.  Dietary iron has two forms, heme (animal based) and non-heme (plant based), important sources are; grass fed beef, oysters, spinach, lentils and beans.

Iron contributes to:

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin

·         normal oxygen transport in the body

·         normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         normal cognitive development of children

·         Iron has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Zinc
more info...
High in Zinc

Zinc is a metal that functions as an essential nutrient in the body, it is found in every cell and has been used since ancient times, with Ayurvedic texts dating as far back as the 14th century recommending its application in various forms.  Although only required in limited amounts, zinc supports important bodily processes like strengthening the immune system – your body needs zinc to make T-cells, a type of white blood cell that fights off foreign invaders in your bloodstream.  With antioxidant properties, zinc helps to protect the cells in the body from damage by free radicals and supports the catalytic activity of various enzymes essential in DNA synthesis and cell division.  In males, zinc assists in spermatogenesis (the production of mature spermatozoa) and is a critical mineral for robust testosterone levels, in females it aids in all the reproductive phases including the birth and lactation stages. 

Zinc is an essential component of over 300 enzymes participating in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins and other macronutrients and has a regulatory role in vitamin A transport mediated through protein synthesis.  The intake of zinc has a positive influence on bone mass, it is an important cofactor in the stimulation of bone building osteoblasts (cells that synthesize bone), it accelerates the renewal of skin cells and it is essential for healthy nails and shiny hair.  Zinc is vital for vision with high concentrations found in the retina and may also protect from night blindness and prevent the development of cataracts.  This super nutrient also plays a crucial role in memory formation and cognitive stability, ensuring a proper intake of zinc is an important step towards optimal brain function.  Topping the list of zinc rich foods are oysters, however seeds such as chia, sunflower, hemp and pumpkin are also rich sources of this important mineral.

Zinc contributes to:

·         normal DNA synthesis

·         normal acid-base metabolism

·         normal carbohydrate metabolism

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal fertility and reproduction

·         normal macronutrient metabolism

·         normal metabolism of fatty acids

·         normal metabolism of Vitamin A

·         normal protein synthesis

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

HIGH IN
Copper
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High in Copper

An essential trace mineral in the body, copper has long been known to play a role in human health – its use dates back to 400 BC when Hippocrates is said to have employed it as a treatment for a variety of disorders.  Playing a beneficial role in immune function, you need copper for healthy white blood cells – the cell type tasked with seeking out, identifying and destroying pathogens.  Low copper levels lower your white blood count leaving you vulnerable to infection. 

Copper is a vital element of the dark pigment melanin which imparts colouration to the hair and skin, intake of copper is said to protect greying hair.  Copper helps in the absorption of iron from the intestinal tract and releases it from its primary storage sites like the liver.  Also playing a significant role in the synthesis of haemoglobin, myelin and collagen, copper helps to protect the myelin sheath surrounding the nerves and is actively involved in the production of an element of connective tissue, elastin.  Functioning as a coenzyme for energy metabolism from the macronutrients in food we consume, copper enables a normal metabolic process in association with amino acids and vitamins.  Oxidative stress is a characteristic of copper deficiency, when obtained from dietary sources it acts as an antioxidant, getting rid of free radicals which can damage your cells and DNA.  For your body to use copper you need to have a balance of zinc and manganese which is why it is best to obtain your copper from dietary sources where it is already in bioavailable form.  Topping the chart as the best source of copper are oysters!  Closely followed by kale, shitake mushrooms, seeds, nuts and nut butters.

Copper Contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal connective tissues

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal hair pigmentation

·         normal iron transport in the body

·         normal skin pigmentation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

 

 

HIGH IN
Manganese
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High in Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

SOURCE OF
Protein
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Source of Protein

Proteins are a group of biological compounds which are present in every live cell, organ and tissue of the body.  Meaning “first” or “of prime importance” in Greek, proteins participate in every cellular process occurring in the body.  Proteins are made up of structures called amino acids, there are a total of 21 amino acids, 9 are essential, the rest are nonessential – you must consume the essential amino acids in your diet because your body cannot make them. 

Dietary protein supports bone health in three main ways: by supplying the raw material required to construct soft bone matrix, by increasing plasma IGF1 and by promoting muscle growth and retention.  IGF1 is a growth hormone that stimulates and increases the activity of osteoblasts (cells which secrete the substance of bone).  It is especially important to ensure that children get enough protein since they are still developing and it is necessary to ensure their growth is unimpaired.  Proteins play an important role in muscle contraction and coordination, they are present in the muscle tissues in the form of many microfilaments and provide muscle structure.  Muscle growth depends on the adequacy of proteins in the body.  Proteins function as building blocks for muscles, bones and cartilage, opt for a variety of whole foods to meet your protein needs including; grass fed meat and poultry, eggs, dairy, seeds, beans and nuts.

Protein contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         a growth in muscle mass

·         the maintenance of muscle mass

·         Protein is needed for normal growth and development of bone in children.

SOURCE OF
Vitamin E
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Source of Vitamin E

Vitamin E is an umbrella term for a group of eight fat soluble compounds (tocopherols) that are found in a wide variety of wholefoods.  These compounds, of which alpha-tocopherol is the most biologically active, have a number of functions in the body. 

Vitamin E is an important antioxidant whose primary role in the body is to scavenge free radicals – these are rogue atoms or atomic groups that have lost at least one electron, forcing them to steal electrons from neighbouring molecules in the hope of stabilizing themselves.  Whilst unsurprisingly this can cause havoc in the body, vitamin E has the ability to neutralize these free radicals thus protecting the cells from oxidative stress.  Vitamin E deficiency is rare due to its ability, whilst working in concert with a number of other compounds (including vitamin C), to restore reduced levels of vitamin E in the body.  The richest source of vitamin E is wheat germ, other foods that contain significant amounts include eggs, nuts, sunflower seeds, cold-pressed vegetable oils and avocados.

Vitamin E contributes to:

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

·         the regeneration of the reduced form of Vitamin E

SOURCE OF
Potassium
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Source of Potassium

Potassium, the third most abundant mineral in the human body, is an essential mineral whose ions are vital for the functioning of all living cells!  Potassium plays a role at both the cellular and electrical level – considered and electrolyte because it carries a tiny electrical charge – it is found in red blood cells, muscles and bones.  Our bodies use potassium ions to conduct electrical impulses along muscle and nerve cells, it helps to boost the efficiency of nerve reflexes that transmit messages from one body part to another, this in turn helps in muscle contraction to perform various activities without tiring quickly. 

Potassium also has vasodilating properties that work to relieve the tension of blood vessels which is one of the main causes of high blood pressure.  It is helpful in reversing the role of sodium in unbalancing normal blood pressure thus acting as a vital component that maintains the normality of blood pressure in the human body.  The importance of potassium should not be underestimated in your dietary plan, most famously found in bananas other rich sources of potassium include spinach, avocados and coconut water.

Potassium contributes to:

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         the maintenance of normal blood pressure

SOURCE OF
Selenium
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Source of Selenium

Selenium is an essential trace element that plays an important role in a number of physiological processes in humans.  It is a key element in spermatogenesis (the production or development of mature spermatozoa) and male fertility.  Selenium has also been shown to support the immune system by promoting the production of killer T-cells (a type of white blood cell), which engulf and destroy harmful foreign substances that enter the body and could otherwise cause disease and infection.  Selenium works in close conjunction with vitamin E as an antioxidant to prevent the formation of free radicals which can weaken and damage cells in every organ system. 

In addition, research has shown that selenium is an essential component of the thyroid gland’s functions, helping to regulate the amount of the thyroid hormone T3 that is produced within the body – without selenium the T3 hormone cannot be produced which can be catastrophic to a wide variety of your body’s systems.  It is believed that good selenium intake can help to prevent hair loss and promote shiny hair and healthy nail growthBrazil nuts are the richest source of selenium discovered so far, also found in mushrooms, shellfish, garlic, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, selenium is destroyed when foods are refined or processed so eating a variety of whole, unprocessed foods is the best way to get selenium into your diet.

Selenium contributes to:

·         normal spermatogenesis

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         normal thyroid function

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

Organic Quinoa Black
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 25g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
25
 
Energy KJ/Kcal
1499KJ/355Kcal
375KJ/89Kcal
4.46%
Fat
4.0g
1.0g
1.43%
of which saturates
1.0g
0.3g
 
Carbohydrate
51.0g
12.8g
4.90%
of which sugars
3.0g
0.8g
0.83%
Protein
16.7g
4.2g
8.35%
Dietary Fibre
8.8g
2.2g
 
Salt
21.00mg
5.25mg
0.09%
Vitamin E
2.44mg
0.61mg
5.08%
Vitamin B1
0.36mg
0.09mg
8.18%
Folate
0.18mg
0.05mg
22.50%
Potassium
563.00mg
140.75mg
7.04%
Phosphorus
457.00mg
114.25mg
16.32%
Magnesium
197.00mg
49.25mg
13.13%
Iron
4.57mg
1.14mg
8.16%
Zinc
3.10mg
0.78mg
7.75%
Copper
0.59mg
0.15mg
14.75%
Manganese
2.00mg
0.50mg
25.00%
Selenium
0.00mg
0.00mg
0.00%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult
  • Certified Organic by The Organic Food Federation
  • Produced to GMP standards
  • Quality Assured by Indigo Herbs
  • Suitable for vegetarians and vegans
  • Gluten free
  • Re-sealable air tight, foil pouch
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added

Manufacture Process

This Quinoa Grain comes from Certified Organic land where it has been hand harvested. Black Quinoa is harvested when the plant and seed have nearly completely dried out and have below 10% moisture remaining. Harvest needs to be precisely timed by eye in order for the seed to be at the perfect maturity. Then begins a simple process of threshing and winnowing to remove of the outer husk of the seed before drying. After this initial drying period the Black Quinoa is washed to remove the pericap (layer containing bitter tasting saponins) before being stored and made ready for sale.

There are some reports of people being allergic to Quinoa and it causing stomach upset.

Buy Organic Brown Flaxseeds 500g from Indigo Herbs

Latin Name: Linum usitatissimum

  • Certified Organic
  • Rich in Omega-3 fatty acids
  • Can be used in many types of cooking and baking
  • Re-sealable air tight, foil pouch.
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added.
£3.89-£4.99
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • How to use

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

  • Contraindications

  • Blogs

  • Recipes

Organic Brown Flaxseeds / Linseeds from Indigo Herbs are a premium quality organic flaxseed seed rich in Omega-3 fatty acids. These Brown Flaxseeds / Linseeds can be utilised in cooking, baking or in a smoothie. One of the healthiest wholefood to have in your kitchen. 

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality botanicals. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and wellbeing, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals.

Both Golden and Brown Flaxseeds are replete with health benefits due to their densely packed nutrition content. A rich source of antioxidant vitamins and minerals, they are high in Vitamin E – an umbrella term for eight fat soluble compounds (tocopherols) – whose primary role is to scavenge free radicals in the body. Copper, Zinc and Manganese further support the antioxidant activity of these nutritional powerhouses, working together to detox and cleanse, thus protecting the cells from oxidative stress. Manganese in particular is a powerful antioxidant, a component of one of the body’s most potent antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) which works alongside glutathione to neutralise reactive oxygen molecules.

Flaxseeds are also high in Vitamin K, another fat soluble vitamin that is essential to the process of blood clotting and necessary for a healthy bone structure. It serves as the “biological glue” that helps to plug Calcium and other important minerals into the bone matrix – Flaxseeds are high in Calcium too.

High in Vitamins B1, B6, B9 (Folate) and a source of Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) – these important compounds are crucial to a healthy digestive system, central nervous system and to the health of the brain. These B vitamins are powerful antioxidants to brain cells and are often referred to as “mood vitamins” as they help the body to make feel good hormones such as serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine.

Flaxseeds are also high in the all important miracle mineral Magnesium. Responsible for over 300 enzymatic processes in the body, it is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions including the creation and transport of energy and the creation and synthesis of proteins.

Lastly but by no means least, flaxseeds are high in Iron – essential to the blood – and in Potassium which is needed to maintain normal blood pressure and to keep the central nervous system running smoothly.

Our Wholefoods are 100% pure and unprocessed with nothing added. They are simple and easy to integrate into your daily diet. Seeds can be roasted or soaked and sprouted. Nuts can be made into nut milk, nut butter or snacked upon. Fruits can flavour a cake, bread or biscuits, or make a great topping to breakfast cereal.

Nuts, seeds and dried fruit all make great ingredients for a superfood snack trail mix, and can supply essential daily nutrients whilst being delicious and satisfying. For full instructions go to our How to use Wholefoods page.

These Organic Brown Flaxseeds can be eaten whole, sprinkled on muesli, fried, or baked in biscuits or bread.

Serving:

Take 1 -2 tbsp of seeds with 1 -2 glasses of water to flush out the digestive system. Use 2 tsps of seeds in 1 cup of hot water, infuse for 10 minutes then drain for a sore throat.

HIGH IN
Dietary Fibre
HIGH IN
Vitamin E
more info...
High in Vitamin E

Vitamin E is an umbrella term for a group of eight fat soluble compounds (tocopherols) that are found in a wide variety of wholefoods.  These compounds, of which alpha-tocopherol is the most biologically active, have a number of functions in the body. 

Vitamin E is an important antioxidant whose primary role in the body is to scavenge free radicals – these are rogue atoms or atomic groups that have lost at least one electron, forcing them to steal electrons from neighbouring molecules in the hope of stabilizing themselves.  Whilst unsurprisingly this can cause havoc in the body, vitamin E has the ability to neutralize these free radicals thus protecting the cells from oxidative stress.  Vitamin E deficiency is rare due to its ability, whilst working in concert with a number of other compounds (including vitamin C), to restore reduced levels of vitamin E in the body.  The richest source of vitamin E is wheat germ, other foods that contain significant amounts include eggs, nuts, sunflower seeds, cold-pressed vegetable oils and avocados.

Vitamin E contributes to:

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

·         the regeneration of the reduced form of Vitamin E

HIGH IN
Vitamin K
more info...
High in Vitamin K

Vitamin K is a fat soluble vitamin which is best known for its role in helping your blood to clot or coagulate properly by helping to form the proteins necessary for your bloods clotting factor.  The K comes from its German name “Koagulations” vitamin. 

There are two types of naturally occurring vitamin K; vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) which is found naturally in plants and vitamin K2 (menaquinone) which is made by the bacteria that line your gastrointestinal tract.  For proper bone growth and maintenance your body uses multiple vitamins, however, vitamin K and vitamin D work in tandem to produce a protein (osteocalcin) necessary for bones, without this protein minerals could not bind together to form the density of the bones.  Fermented foods, such as natto, typically have the highest concentrations of vitamin K found in the human diet followed by alfalfa seeds and dark leafy greens such as spinach, kale and cabbage.

Vitamin K contributes to:

·         normal blood clotting

·         the maintenance of normal bones

HIGH IN
Vitamin B1
more info...
High in Vitamin B1

Also known as thiamin, vitamin B1 is one of the eight water soluble vitamins in the vitamin B family.  It is a vital human nutrient playing an important role in how we convert our food into energy – when we consume our food it is broken down into simpler units such as carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, vitamin B1 plays a crucial role in utilising these units to produce energy.  This is especially true for cells in the brain where the energy demand is really high which is why it is also referred to as a “morale vitamin” for its positive effect on the nervous system and a healthy mental attitude! 

Promoting the health of the nervous system, vitamin B1 helps in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress, it is often called the “anti-stress” vitamin and is also reported to improve the memory and powers of concentration.  Thiamin is essential to the body’s cardiac heath, involved in blood formation and helping in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is used to relay messages between the nerves and muscles to ensure proper cardiac function.  Brewer’s yeast and liver are the richest sources of vitamin B1, however, spirulina, linseeds, rye, wheat germ and kidney beans are also important sources of this vitamin.

Vitamin B1 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the normal function of the heart

HIGH IN
Vitamin B6
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High in Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, plays an essential role in human life and is the most versatile of all the B vitamins!  Working closely with the other B vitamins, vitamin B6 contributes to numerous functions in the body.  It plays an important role in refurbishing the immune system to the required functional level, this potential health benefit appears to be associated with its role in the metabolism of the amino acid tryptophan.  Also referred to as the “mood vitamin”, B6 is needed for proper brain development and function, preventing mental fatigue and helping the body make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine that relax and lift your spirits, along with melatonin, the hormone which regulates the body clock. 

Vitamin B6 is functional in working with a number of enzymatic systems to make these enzymes work in the desired manner, this association contributes to the proper functioning of the nervous system.  It is also involved at several steps in the metabolism of carbohydrates, in particular the enzyme that pulls carbohydrates out of storage in the cell - in the form of a molecule called glycogen – which requires vitamin B6 for its activity and it metabolises a number of other nutrients to extract energy.  Vitamin B6 is a key factor in the manufacture of haemoglobin – the oxygen carrying component of red blood cells – and has a role in preventing heart disease.  Without enough B6 a compound called homocysteine builds up in the body which can damage blood vessel linings, setting the stage for plaque build-up when the body tries to heal the damage.  Vitamin B6 prevents this build-up thereby reducing the risk of heart attack.  The availability of this important vitamin is highest in foods like spirulina, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, green beans, walnuts and wheat germ.

Vitamin B6 contributes to:

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal homocysteine metabolism

·         normal protein and glycogen metabolism

·         normal psychological function

·         normal red blood cell formation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         the regulation of hormonal activity

·         normal cysteine synthesis

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Folate
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High in Folate

Folate – the naturally occurring vitamin B9 – is often confused with folic acid.  Folic acid is a synthetically derived molecule created in a German laboratory in the 1940s and does not occur naturally in food.  Needless to say, folate metabolizes faster in the body and any excess is excreted through the urine whereas folic acid can accumulate in the blood and may adversely affect immune cell function.  Nature knows best when it comes to nutrition!  Folate is probably the vitamin whose essential role in pregnancy is most widely known.  It is necessary for the production of new DNA which is needed for the production of new cells – the growing life within the womb engages in constant cell division and the mother must expand her blood supply with the production of new red blood cells – these activities demand a generous supply of folate. 

Folate works to convert the amino acid homocysteine into methionine - a deficiency allows homocysteine levels to accumulate in the body.  High levels of homocysteine are associated with heart disease and stroke and can block blood and other nutrients from reaching the brain, interfering with the production of the feel good hormones serotonin and dopamine which regulate mood.  Within the body, folate is an activator – it has an influence on “natural killer” cells of the immune system which are in charge of fighting infections and malignant cells.  Romaine lettuce, spinach and asparagus are especially high in folate; other good sources include egg yolks, legumes and lentils.

Folate contributes to:

  • maternal tissue growth during pregnancy
  • normal amino acid synthesis
  • normal blood formation
  • normal homocysteine metabolism
  • normal psychological function
  • the normal function of the immune system
  • the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
  • Folate has a role in the process of cell division
HIGH IN
Potassium
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High in Potassium

Potassium, the third most abundant mineral in the human body, is an essential mineral whose ions are vital for the functioning of all living cells!  Potassium plays a role at both the cellular and electrical level – considered and electrolyte because it carries a tiny electrical charge – it is found in red blood cells, muscles and bones.  Our bodies use potassium ions to conduct electrical impulses along muscle and nerve cells, it helps to boost the efficiency of nerve reflexes that transmit messages from one body part to another, this in turn helps in muscle contraction to perform various activities without tiring quickly. 

Potassium also has vasodilating properties that work to relieve the tension of blood vessels which is one of the main causes of high blood pressure.  It is helpful in reversing the role of sodium in unbalancing normal blood pressure thus acting as a vital component that maintains the normality of blood pressure in the human body.  The importance of potassium should not be underestimated in your dietary plan, most famously found in bananas other rich sources of potassium include spinach, avocados and coconut water.

Potassium contributes to:

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         the maintenance of normal blood pressure

HIGH IN
Calcium
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High in Calcium

Forming 2% of total body weight in adults, calcium’s best known role is in bone and tooth health.  It forms a part of hydroxyapatite, the mineral complex that makes your bones and teeth hard and maintains bone density.  It is especially important that children consume an adequate amount of calcium to maximise their bone mass prior to adult years.  Also an important part of the blood clotting process, calcium works together with vitamin K and a protein called fibrinogen in the clotting cascade, without adequate levels of calcium and vitamin K the blood will take longer to clot.  Calcium helps your muscles contract in response to nerve stimulation, it activates a protein called calmodulin that your muscle cells need to provide the fuel they need to function.  Assisting in the transmission of neural impulses, the calcium in your body also aids other types of cell communication – it acts as a “second messenger” in your cells which means it responds to chemical signals from outside your cells and then triggers a response inside your cell. 

Calcium helps to activate several digestive enzymes and there is considerable evidence that calcium and vitamin D intake are influential in modulating energy metabolism in humans.  Like all minerals, calcium doesn’t work alone but in tandem with other nutrients such as magnesium and vitamin D, for this reason, obtaining our calcium from whole foods – foods whose nutrient profiles have been optimised by nature for superior absorption – is the best way to remain healthy!  Excellent natural calcium sources include; chia seeds, sesame seeds, seaweed (such as kelp and Kombu), dark leafy greens and dairy products (such as yoghurt, cheese and kefir).

Calcium contributes to:

·         normal blood clotting

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal muscle function

·         normal neurotransmission

·         the normal function of digestive enzymes

·         Calcium has a role in the process of cell division and specialisation

·         Calcium is needed for the maintenance of normal bones

·         Calcium is needed for the maintenance of normal teeth

·         Calcium is needed for normal growth and development of bone in children

 

HIGH IN
Magnesium
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High in Magnesium

The importance of magnesium ions for all life itself, as well as for overall vibrant health, is hard to overstate.  Frequently referred to as the “miracle mineral”, magnesium is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions involving the creation of energy and its transport, the creation and synthesis of proteins and is involved in literally hundreds of enzymatic reactions - it activates the enzymes that make copies of DNA and RNA making it essential in the process of cell division. 

Roughly half of your body’s magnesium is stored in your bones and acts as a cofactor with calcium and vitamin D to maintain and strengthen the bone structure and teeth (your teeth can only form hard enamel from calcium if magnesium is available).  It also works, again in concert with calcium, to regulate electrical impulses in the cells.  Cellular calcium channels allow the mineral to enter the cell only as long as needed to conduct an impulse, it is ushered out immediately by magnesium once its task is fulfilled, operating as a natural calcium channel blocker and responsible for relaxation, magnesium is pivotally important to the functioning of the parasympathetic nervous system.  Both magnesium and calcium are intimately involved with muscle function (magnesium relaxes, calcium contracts) with frequent muscle cramps being a symptom of a deficiency in magnesium.  If magnesium is severely deficient, the brain is particularly affected as magnesium is crucial to the production of neurotransmitters and the integrity of the blood brain barrier and therefore is needed to maintain normal psychological function.  The best food sources of magnesium include; avocados, chia and hemp seeds, sesame seeds, raw cacao and raw chocolate, sprouted nuts/seeds, sea vegetables (such as kelp and nori), raw green vegetables and grass fed dairy products.

Magnesium contributes to:

·         a reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         electrolyte balance

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         normal protein synthesis

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         Magnesium has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Iron
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High in Iron

Iron is needed for a number of highly complex processes that continuously take place in the body on a molecular level and that are indispensable to human life.  Formation of haemoglobin is the chief function of this mineral – this is the primary protein found in red blood cells and represents about two thirds of the body’s iron.  Haemoglobin binds to the oxygen molecules that you breathe in from the air and releases them into your tissues.  The brain receives around 20% of the blood oxygen and a proper flow of blood to the brain can stimulate cognitive activity and help to create new neural pathways, it is especially important that children consume enough iron in their diet – iron deficiency in the first two years of a child’s life is associated with delayed cognitive and psychomotor development.  

Ribonucleic reductase is an iron dependant enzyme that is required for DNA synthesis (cell division), thus iron is required for a number of functions including healing and immune function - red blood cells are necessary for providing oxygen to damaged tissues, organs and cells.  Iron is also involved in food metabolism and is a cofactor and activator for some enzymes which play key roles in energy production and metabolism.  If iron stores are low symptoms can include tiredness, fatigue and dizziness.  Dietary iron has two forms, heme (animal based) and non-heme (plant based), important sources are; grass fed beef, oysters, spinach, lentils and beans.

Iron contributes to:

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin

·         normal oxygen transport in the body

·         normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         normal cognitive development of children

·         Iron has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Zinc
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High in Zinc

Zinc is a metal that functions as an essential nutrient in the body, it is found in every cell and has been used since ancient times, with Ayurvedic texts dating as far back as the 14th century recommending its application in various forms.  Although only required in limited amounts, zinc supports important bodily processes like strengthening the immune system – your body needs zinc to make T-cells, a type of white blood cell that fights off foreign invaders in your bloodstream.  With antioxidant properties, zinc helps to protect the cells in the body from damage by free radicals and supports the catalytic activity of various enzymes essential in DNA synthesis and cell division.  In males, zinc assists in spermatogenesis (the production of mature spermatozoa) and is a critical mineral for robust testosterone levels, in females it aids in all the reproductive phases including the birth and lactation stages. 

Zinc is an essential component of over 300 enzymes participating in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins and other macronutrients and has a regulatory role in vitamin A transport mediated through protein synthesis.  The intake of zinc has a positive influence on bone mass, it is an important cofactor in the stimulation of bone building osteoblasts (cells that synthesize bone), it accelerates the renewal of skin cells and it is essential for healthy nails and shiny hair.  Zinc is vital for vision with high concentrations found in the retina and may also protect from night blindness and prevent the development of cataracts.  This super nutrient also plays a crucial role in memory formation and cognitive stability, ensuring a proper intake of zinc is an important step towards optimal brain function.  Topping the list of zinc rich foods are oysters, however seeds such as chia, sunflower, hemp and pumpkin are also rich sources of this important mineral.

Zinc contributes to:

·         normal DNA synthesis

·         normal acid-base metabolism

·         normal carbohydrate metabolism

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal fertility and reproduction

·         normal macronutrient metabolism

·         normal metabolism of fatty acids

·         normal metabolism of Vitamin A

·         normal protein synthesis

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

HIGH IN
Copper
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High in Copper

An essential trace mineral in the body, copper has long been known to play a role in human health – its use dates back to 400 BC when Hippocrates is said to have employed it as a treatment for a variety of disorders.  Playing a beneficial role in immune function, you need copper for healthy white blood cells – the cell type tasked with seeking out, identifying and destroying pathogens.  Low copper levels lower your white blood count leaving you vulnerable to infection. 

Copper is a vital element of the dark pigment melanin which imparts colouration to the hair and skin, intake of copper is said to protect greying hair.  Copper helps in the absorption of iron from the intestinal tract and releases it from its primary storage sites like the liver.  Also playing a significant role in the synthesis of haemoglobin, myelin and collagen, copper helps to protect the myelin sheath surrounding the nerves and is actively involved in the production of an element of connective tissue, elastin.  Functioning as a coenzyme for energy metabolism from the macronutrients in food we consume, copper enables a normal metabolic process in association with amino acids and vitamins.  Oxidative stress is a characteristic of copper deficiency, when obtained from dietary sources it acts as an antioxidant, getting rid of free radicals which can damage your cells and DNA.  For your body to use copper you need to have a balance of zinc and manganese which is why it is best to obtain your copper from dietary sources where it is already in bioavailable form.  Topping the chart as the best source of copper are oysters!  Closely followed by kale, shitake mushrooms, seeds, nuts and nut butters.

Copper Contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal connective tissues

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal hair pigmentation

·         normal iron transport in the body

·         normal skin pigmentation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

 

 

HIGH IN
Manganese
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High in Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

SOURCE OF
Protein
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Source of Protein

Proteins are a group of biological compounds which are present in every live cell, organ and tissue of the body.  Meaning “first” or “of prime importance” in Greek, proteins participate in every cellular process occurring in the body.  Proteins are made up of structures called amino acids, there are a total of 21 amino acids, 9 are essential, the rest are nonessential – you must consume the essential amino acids in your diet because your body cannot make them. 

Dietary protein supports bone health in three main ways: by supplying the raw material required to construct soft bone matrix, by increasing plasma IGF1 and by promoting muscle growth and retention.  IGF1 is a growth hormone that stimulates and increases the activity of osteoblasts (cells which secrete the substance of bone).  It is especially important to ensure that children get enough protein since they are still developing and it is necessary to ensure their growth is unimpaired.  Proteins play an important role in muscle contraction and coordination, they are present in the muscle tissues in the form of many microfilaments and provide muscle structure.  Muscle growth depends on the adequacy of proteins in the body.  Proteins function as building blocks for muscles, bones and cartilage, opt for a variety of whole foods to meet your protein needs including; grass fed meat and poultry, eggs, dairy, seeds, beans and nuts.

Protein contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         a growth in muscle mass

·         the maintenance of muscle mass

·         Protein is needed for normal growth and development of bone in children.

SOURCE OF
Vitamin B3
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Source of Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3, also known as niacin, is an essential nutrient that must be provided for in your diet. The health benefits of niacin are primarily derived from its use in producing a coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or NAD, with one of the most important health benefits being its role in producing energy from dietary carbohydrates and fats.  Vitamin B3 seems to have a particularly potent role in maintaining mental agility and is important for the proper functioning of all cells including the cells of the brain and the nervous system - it acts as a powerful antioxidant in brain cells.  When the nervous system is working properly symptoms such as anxiety and mood swings can be prevented, even a slight deficiency in vitamin B3 can cause physical and mental fatigue. 

The most common symptom of niacin deficiency involves the skin with a severe deficiency leading to dermatitis and a condition called “pellagra” where a thick scaly rash develops in areas exposed to sunlight.  If pellagra is left untreated it can perturb the mucous membranes of the mouth and tongue making them red and swollen.  Vitamin B3 is found abundantly in chia seeds with just 100 grams providing approximately 55% of daily required levels.  Other good sources include sesame and sunflower seeds, nuts and nut butters, capers and brewer’s yeast.

Vitamin B3 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal mucous membranes

·         the maintenance of normal skin

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

SOURCE OF
Pantothenic Acid
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Source of Pantothenic Acid

Also called vitamin B5, pantothenic acid gets its name from the Greek root pantos meaning “everywhere” as it can be found throughout all living cells.  The most studied role of pantothenic acid in health support is its incorporation into a molecule called coenzyme A (CoA), this occupies a central place in energy metabolism, acting to allow carbohydrates, fats and proteins to be burned as energy sources.  It is also helpful in reducing body fatigue and weariness and it sets the metabolic process of the entire body on the right track making it capable of increasing the stamina of the human body. 

Sometimes referred to as the “anti-stress” vitamin, pantothenic acid may help to encourage the production of dopamine and serotonin which are neurotransmitter chemicals that regulate mood and reduce anxiety and stress.  Also aiding in the production of vitamin D, pantothenic acid supports the adrenal gland which produces steroid hormones and generally keeps the gland in optimal health.  Given the critical role it plays in health it’s a good thing that pantothenic acid is so ubiquitous in wholefoods with shiitake mushrooms providing the richest natural source of this essential nutrient, closely followed by cauliflower, sweet potato and broccoli.

Pantothenic acid contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal mental performance

·         normal synthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones, Vitamin D and some neurotransmitters

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

Brown Flaxseeds
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 7g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
7
 
Energy KJ/ Kcal
1696KJ/405Kcal
119KJ/28Kcal
1.41%
Fat
34g
2.38g
3.40%
of which saturates
7.9g
0.55g
 
Carbohydrate
29g
2.03g
0.78%
of which sugars
1g
0.07g
 
Protein
19.5g
1.37g
2.73%
Dietary Fibre
27.9g
1.95g
 
Salt
0.00mg
0.00mg
0.00%
Vitamin E
19.95mg
1.4mg
11.64%
Vitamin K
0.04mg
0.00mg
4.01%
Vitamin B1
1.64mg
0.11mg
10.44%
Vitamin B3
3.08mg
0.22mg
1.35%
Vitamin B6
0.47mg
0.03mg
2.37%
Folate
0.09mg
0.01mg
3.05%
Pantothenic Acid
0.99mg
0.07mg
1.15%
Potassium
813mg
56.91mg
2.85%
Calcium
255mg
17.85mg
2.23%
Magnesium
392mg
27.44mg
7.32%
Iron
5.73mg
0.4mg
2.87%
Zinc
4.34mg
0.3mg
3.04%
Copper
1.12mg
0.08mg
7.84%
Manganese
2.48mg
0.17mg
8.68%
Omega 3
22.8g
 
 
Omega 6
5.9g
 
 
RDA: reference intake of an average adult
  • Certified Organic by The Organic Food Federation.
  • Produced to GMP standards.
  • Quality Assured by Indigo Herbs.
  • Suitable for vegetarians and vegans.
  • Gluten free.
  • Re-sealable air tight, foil pouch.
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added.

Manufacture Process

Indigo Herbs Brown Flaxseeds are cultivated and harvested  under strict organic conditions. There has been no use of pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers that have a man made chemical composition. When the Linum usitatissimum plants are mature for harvest the crop is cut by combine harvester and the seed mechanically separated from the plant matter. The seed then goes through a process of vibration cleaning to separate the seed from any small particles. The Flaxseed is then air dried and tested for heavy metals and microbial activity before being made ready for shipping. This whole process complies with GMP standards and is quality assured by Indigo Herbs.

Not suitable for young children

Buy Organic Brown Rice Flour from Indigo Herbs

Latin Name: Oryza sativa

  • Certifed Organic
  • Gluten Free & High in Fibre
  • A Great Alternative to Traditional Flours
  • Resealable air tight, foil pouch.
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added.
£4.99
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • How to use

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

  • Contraindications

  • Blogs

  • Recipes

Organic Brown Rice Flour from Indigo Herbs is a Gluten Free Rice Flour that is a fantastic substitute to regular flours. Choose this great quality Organic Rice Flour to make delicious high fibre biscuits, bread and other gluten free treats.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality Wholefoods. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the health benefits, quality, manufacture and suggested use of this wholefood. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and wellbeing, by having access to many of natures healing botanicals and Superfoods.

Our Organic Brown Rice Flour is High in Vitamins B1 and B6, both crucial nutrients to the Central Nervous System. Sometimes referred to as the anti-stress vitamin, B1 assists in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress. B6 works with a number of enzymatic systems which contribute to the proper functioning of the nervous system. Both B Vitamins are important in the health of the brain, helping to prevent mental fatigue and aiding the body in making “feel good” hormones.

Also High in Phosphorus and Magnesium, these essential minerals are necessary for a strong skeletal structure, bones and teeth. Phosphorus must be in proper balance with Calcium and Magnesium and is the most abundant mineral in the body.

One serving of Brown Rice provides a whopping 138% of the RDA for Manganese, a potent antioxidant mineral that is a component of the antioxidant enzyme “super-oxide dismutase”. SOD will seek out and destroy free radicals which can damage cell membranes and DNA.

A Source of Copper and Zinc – these two minerals are also powerfully antioxidant and immune system boosters. 

Our Wholefoods are 100% pure and unprocessed with nothing added. They are simple and easy to integrate into your daily diet. Seeds can be roasted or soaked and sprouted. Nuts can be made into nut milk, nut butter or snacked upon. Fruits can flavour a cake, bread or biscuits, or make a great topping to breakfast cereal.

Nuts, seeds and dried fruit all make great ingredients for a superfood snack trail mix, and can supply essential daily nutrients whilst being delicious and satisfying. For full instructions go to our How to use Wholefoods page.

Organic Brown Rice Flour can be used as a substitute for conventional flour in the right ratio. Rice Flour can be used to bake biscuits, cake and breads.

 Serving:

From 10% to 30% of Organic Brown Rice Flour can be used instead of regular flour.

HIGH IN
Vitamin B1
more info...
High in Vitamin B1

Also known as thiamin, vitamin B1 is one of the eight water soluble vitamins in the vitamin B family.  It is a vital human nutrient playing an important role in how we convert our food into energy – when we consume our food it is broken down into simpler units such as carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, vitamin B1 plays a crucial role in utilising these units to produce energy.  This is especially true for cells in the brain where the energy demand is really high which is why it is also referred to as a “morale vitamin” for its positive effect on the nervous system and a healthy mental attitude! 

Promoting the health of the nervous system, vitamin B1 helps in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress, it is often called the “anti-stress” vitamin and is also reported to improve the memory and powers of concentration.  Thiamin is essential to the body’s cardiac heath, involved in blood formation and helping in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is used to relay messages between the nerves and muscles to ensure proper cardiac function.  Brewer’s yeast and liver are the richest sources of vitamin B1, however, spirulina, linseeds, rye, wheat germ and kidney beans are also important sources of this vitamin.

Vitamin B1 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the normal function of the heart

HIGH IN
Vitamin B3
more info...
High in Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3, also known as niacin, is an essential nutrient that must be provided for in your diet. The health benefits of niacin are primarily derived from its use in producing a coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or NAD, with one of the most important health benefits being its role in producing energy from dietary carbohydrates and fats.  Vitamin B3 seems to have a particularly potent role in maintaining mental agility and is important for the proper functioning of all cells including the cells of the brain and the nervous system - it acts as a powerful antioxidant in brain cells.  When the nervous system is working properly symptoms such as anxiety and mood swings can be prevented, even a slight deficiency in vitamin B3 can cause physical and mental fatigue. 

The most common symptom of niacin deficiency involves the skin with a severe deficiency leading to dermatitis and a condition called “pellagra” where a thick scaly rash develops in areas exposed to sunlight.  If pellagra is left untreated it can perturb the mucous membranes of the mouth and tongue making them red and swollen.  Vitamin B3 is found abundantly in chia seeds with just 100 grams providing approximately 55% of daily required levels.  Other good sources include sesame and sunflower seeds, nuts and nut butters, capers and brewer’s yeast.

Vitamin B3 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal mucous membranes

·         the maintenance of normal skin

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

HIGH IN
Vitamin B6
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High in Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, plays an essential role in human life and is the most versatile of all the B vitamins!  Working closely with the other B vitamins, vitamin B6 contributes to numerous functions in the body.  It plays an important role in refurbishing the immune system to the required functional level, this potential health benefit appears to be associated with its role in the metabolism of the amino acid tryptophan.  Also referred to as the “mood vitamin”, B6 is needed for proper brain development and function, preventing mental fatigue and helping the body make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine that relax and lift your spirits, along with melatonin, the hormone which regulates the body clock. 

Vitamin B6 is functional in working with a number of enzymatic systems to make these enzymes work in the desired manner, this association contributes to the proper functioning of the nervous system.  It is also involved at several steps in the metabolism of carbohydrates, in particular the enzyme that pulls carbohydrates out of storage in the cell - in the form of a molecule called glycogen – which requires vitamin B6 for its activity and it metabolises a number of other nutrients to extract energy.  Vitamin B6 is a key factor in the manufacture of haemoglobin – the oxygen carrying component of red blood cells – and has a role in preventing heart disease.  Without enough B6 a compound called homocysteine builds up in the body which can damage blood vessel linings, setting the stage for plaque build-up when the body tries to heal the damage.  Vitamin B6 prevents this build-up thereby reducing the risk of heart attack.  The availability of this important vitamin is highest in foods like spirulina, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, green beans, walnuts and wheat germ.

Vitamin B6 contributes to:

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal homocysteine metabolism

·         normal protein and glycogen metabolism

·         normal psychological function

·         normal red blood cell formation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         the regulation of hormonal activity

·         normal cysteine synthesis

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Phosphorus
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High in Phosphorus

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body.  In order to be properly utilised it must be in proper balance with calcium and magnesium in the blood, these are the two minerals it works in tandem with to create strong bones and teeth, also helping to lay the foundation of a strong skeletal structure.  It is an essential part of our diet - especially as children when the most bone growth and development occurs.  Both DNA and RNA contain phosphorus which make it important for cellular reproduction. 

Phosphorus also contributes to the repair process and maintenance of various body cells which suffer from daily wear and tear, it makes up part of the phospholipids that surround cells - phospholipids help to protect and regulate what goes in and out of each cell.  Phosphorus plays an essential role in how the body stores and uses energy, it aids in the process of energy extraction by stimulating the process of metabolism of different nutrients including niacin(B3) and riboflavin(B2), helping to maximise the uptake of these two vitamins in particular.  The best sources for this mineral are chlorella, dairy, whole grains, legumes and nuts.

Phosphorus contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         the normal growth and development of bone in children

·         the normal function of cell membranes

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Magnesium
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High in Magnesium

The importance of magnesium ions for all life itself, as well as for overall vibrant health, is hard to overstate.  Frequently referred to as the “miracle mineral”, magnesium is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions involving the creation of energy and its transport, the creation and synthesis of proteins and is involved in literally hundreds of enzymatic reactions - it activates the enzymes that make copies of DNA and RNA making it essential in the process of cell division. 

Roughly half of your body’s magnesium is stored in your bones and acts as a cofactor with calcium and vitamin D to maintain and strengthen the bone structure and teeth (your teeth can only form hard enamel from calcium if magnesium is available).  It also works, again in concert with calcium, to regulate electrical impulses in the cells.  Cellular calcium channels allow the mineral to enter the cell only as long as needed to conduct an impulse, it is ushered out immediately by magnesium once its task is fulfilled, operating as a natural calcium channel blocker and responsible for relaxation, magnesium is pivotally important to the functioning of the parasympathetic nervous system.  Both magnesium and calcium are intimately involved with muscle function (magnesium relaxes, calcium contracts) with frequent muscle cramps being a symptom of a deficiency in magnesium.  If magnesium is severely deficient, the brain is particularly affected as magnesium is crucial to the production of neurotransmitters and the integrity of the blood brain barrier and therefore is needed to maintain normal psychological function.  The best food sources of magnesium include; avocados, chia and hemp seeds, sesame seeds, raw cacao and raw chocolate, sprouted nuts/seeds, sea vegetables (such as kelp and nori), raw green vegetables and grass fed dairy products.

Magnesium contributes to:

·         a reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         electrolyte balance

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         normal protein synthesis

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         Magnesium has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Manganese
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High in Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

SOURCE OF
Dietary Fibre
SOURCE OF
Pantothenic Acid
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Source of Pantothenic Acid

Also called vitamin B5, pantothenic acid gets its name from the Greek root pantos meaning “everywhere” as it can be found throughout all living cells.  The most studied role of pantothenic acid in health support is its incorporation into a molecule called coenzyme A (CoA), this occupies a central place in energy metabolism, acting to allow carbohydrates, fats and proteins to be burned as energy sources.  It is also helpful in reducing body fatigue and weariness and it sets the metabolic process of the entire body on the right track making it capable of increasing the stamina of the human body. 

Sometimes referred to as the “anti-stress” vitamin, pantothenic acid may help to encourage the production of dopamine and serotonin which are neurotransmitter chemicals that regulate mood and reduce anxiety and stress.  Also aiding in the production of vitamin D, pantothenic acid supports the adrenal gland which produces steroid hormones and generally keeps the gland in optimal health.  Given the critical role it plays in health it’s a good thing that pantothenic acid is so ubiquitous in wholefoods with shiitake mushrooms providing the richest natural source of this essential nutrient, closely followed by cauliflower, sweet potato and broccoli.

Pantothenic acid contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal mental performance

·         normal synthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones, Vitamin D and some neurotransmitters

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

SOURCE OF
Iron
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Source of Iron

Iron is needed for a number of highly complex processes that continuously take place in the body on a molecular level and that are indispensable to human life.  Formation of haemoglobin is the chief function of this mineral – this is the primary protein found in red blood cells and represents about two thirds of the body’s iron.  Haemoglobin binds to the oxygen molecules that you breathe in from the air and releases them into your tissues.  The brain receives around 20% of the blood oxygen and a proper flow of blood to the brain can stimulate cognitive activity and help to create new neural pathways, it is especially important that children consume enough iron in their diet – iron deficiency in the first two years of a child’s life is associated with delayed cognitive and psychomotor development.  

Ribonucleic reductase is an iron dependant enzyme that is required for DNA synthesis (cell division), thus iron is required for a number of functions including healing and immune function - red blood cells are necessary for providing oxygen to damaged tissues, organs and cells.  Iron is also involved in food metabolism and is a cofactor and activator for some enzymes which play key roles in energy production and metabolism.  If iron stores are low symptoms can include tiredness, fatigue and dizziness.  Dietary iron has two forms, heme (animal based) and non-heme (plant based), important sources are; grass fed beef, oysters, spinach, lentils and beans.

Iron contributes to:

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin

·         normal oxygen transport in the body

·         normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         normal cognitive development of children

·         Iron has a role in the process of cell division

SOURCE OF
Zinc
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Source of Zinc

Zinc is a metal that functions as an essential nutrient in the body, it is found in every cell and has been used since ancient times, with Ayurvedic texts dating as far back as the 14th century recommending its application in various forms.  Although only required in limited amounts, zinc supports important bodily processes like strengthening the immune system – your body needs zinc to make T-cells, a type of white blood cell that fights off foreign invaders in your bloodstream.  With antioxidant properties, zinc helps to protect the cells in the body from damage by free radicals and supports the catalytic activity of various enzymes essential in DNA synthesis and cell division.  In males, zinc assists in spermatogenesis (the production of mature spermatozoa) and is a critical mineral for robust testosterone levels, in females it aids in all the reproductive phases including the birth and lactation stages. 

Zinc is an essential component of over 300 enzymes participating in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins and other macronutrients and has a regulatory role in vitamin A transport mediated through protein synthesis.  The intake of zinc has a positive influence on bone mass, it is an important cofactor in the stimulation of bone building osteoblasts (cells that synthesize bone), it accelerates the renewal of skin cells and it is essential for healthy nails and shiny hair.  Zinc is vital for vision with high concentrations found in the retina and may also protect from night blindness and prevent the development of cataracts.  This super nutrient also plays a crucial role in memory formation and cognitive stability, ensuring a proper intake of zinc is an important step towards optimal brain function.  Topping the list of zinc rich foods are oysters, however seeds such as chia, sunflower, hemp and pumpkin are also rich sources of this important mineral.

Zinc contributes to:

·         normal DNA synthesis

·         normal acid-base metabolism

·         normal carbohydrate metabolism

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal fertility and reproduction

·         normal macronutrient metabolism

·         normal metabolism of fatty acids

·         normal metabolism of Vitamin A

·         normal protein synthesis

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

Organic Brown Rice Flour
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 30g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
30
 
Energy KJ/Kcal
1524KJ/359Kcal
457KJ/108Kcal
5.43%
Fat
1g
0.3g
1.20%
of which saturates
1g
0.3g
 
Carbohydrate
80g
24.0g
8.83%
of which sugars
1g
0.3g
0.30%
Protein
7g
2.1g
4.32%
Dietary Fibre
1g
0.3g
 
Salt
10.00mg
3.00mg
0.04%
Vitamin B1
0.40mg
0.12mg
10.91%
Vitamin B3
6.30mg
1.89mg
11.81%
Vitamin B6
0.70mg
0.21mg
15.00%
Pantothenic acid
1.60mg
0.48mg
8.00%
Phosphorus
337.00mg
101.10mg
14.44%
Magnesium
113.00mg
33.90mg
9.04%
Iron
2.10mg
0.63mg
4.50%
Zinc
2.50mg
0.75mg
7.50%
Manganese
4.00mg
1.20mg
60.00%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult

This Organic Brown Rice Flour comes from Brown Rice that is grown and processed to strict organic standards. After the Brown Rice has been harvested & collected the grains are taken to a site where they are processed for milling. The Brown Rice is first cleaned, dried and excess plant material removed from the grain. It is then stone milled into a fine powder and set out for a second drying phase. After testing and organic checks the Organic Brown Rice Flour is packaged ready to be shipped.

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Buy Organic Chickpea Flour 500g from Indigo Herbs
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Latin Name: Cicer arietinum

  • Certified Organic
  • Naturally Gluten Free
  • Chickpeas Milled into a fine flour
  • HIgh in Fibre, Protein, B Vitamins & Minerals
  • Re-sealable air tight, foil pouch
  • 100% pure botanical ingredients, absolutely nothing added
£4.99-£8.99
Organic Quality Assured Organic Organic Vegetarian and Vegan Safe
  • Full Description

  • Health Benefits

  • How to use

  • Suggested Use

  • Nutritional Information

  • Quality & Manufacture

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Organic Chickpea Flour from Indigo Herbs is a superior gluten free Chickpea Flour made from 100% pure high quality Organic Chickpeas. Gluten Free Chickpea Flour can be used as an alternative to regular flour or mixed in with other ingredients for baking and cooking. Guaranteed to be of the highest quality, Certified Organic and produced to GMP standards.

At Indigo Herbs we are passionate about premium quality botanicals. Explore the tabs on this page to find out more about the quality, manufacture and suggested use of this Gluten Free Flour. We are unable to advise you here on the benefits of our products, however we do recommend you take the opportunity to research the many benefits of this Flour. At Indigo Herbs we are committed to empowering optimum health and nutrition and assisting you to take responsibility for your own health and wellbeing, by having access to many of nature’s healing botanicals. Please consult an Herbalist as to how this product can benefit you.

The chickpeas used to make this delicious flour are chock full of protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals. Vitamins B1 and B6 are crucial to digestive health, the central nervous system and the health of one of our most important organs, the brain. Very important in metabolising the foods we consume, these vitamins are tantamount in utilising the macronutrients into energy we can use and supplying it, in particular, to the brain where energy is in high demand. Promoting the health of the central nervous system, Vitamin B1 helps to protect the myelin sheathes around the nerves whilst B6 works with a number enzymatic systems within this important system – these effects help to boost mood and combat stress.

A single 25g portion of chickpea flour will provide a whopping 55% of your RDA for Folate (B9). This naturally occurring vitamin is probably most famous for its role in a healthy pregnancy – vital for the production of new DNA which is needed to make new cells. Folate also supports the immune system by activating its “natural killer cells” – responsible for fighting off infections.

High in the bone-healthy minerals Phosphorus - which helps to lay the foundation of a strong skeletal structure, and Magnesium which maintains and strengthens the bones and teeth. Magnesium is the miracle mineral for your health, it is involved in over 300 enzymatic processes in the body and is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions.

Our chickpea flour is also High in the antioxidant minerals Copper and Manganese. Manganese in particular is a powerful compound, making up a component of the enzyme superoxide dismutase. This is the body’s most powerful antioxidant and plays a critical role in reducing oxidative damage and inflammation.

Our Wholefoods are 100% pure and unprocessed with nothing added. They are simple and easy to integrate into your daily diet. Seeds can be roasted or soaked and sprouted. Nuts can be made into nut milk, nut butter or snacked upon. Fruits can flavour a cake, bread or biscuits, or make a great topping to breakfast cereal.

Nuts, seeds and dried fruit all make great ingredients for a superfood snack trail mix, and can supply essential daily nutrients whilst being delicious and satisfying. For full instructions go to our How to use Wholefoods page.

Organic Chickpea Flour can be used as a substitute for conventional flour in the right ratio. Chickpea flour can be used to bake biscuits, cake and breads.

Serving:

From 10% to 30% of Organic Chickpea Flour can be used instead of regular flour.

HIGH IN
Protein
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High in Protein

Proteins are a group of biological compounds which are present in every live cell, organ and tissue of the body.  Meaning “first” or “of prime importance” in Greek, proteins participate in every cellular process occurring in the body.  Proteins are made up of structures called amino acids, there are a total of 21 amino acids, 9 are essential, the rest are nonessential – you must consume the essential amino acids in your diet because your body cannot make them. 

Dietary protein supports bone health in three main ways: by supplying the raw material required to construct soft bone matrix, by increasing plasma IGF1 and by promoting muscle growth and retention.  IGF1 is a growth hormone that stimulates and increases the activity of osteoblasts (cells which secrete the substance of bone).  It is especially important to ensure that children get enough protein since they are still developing and it is necessary to ensure their growth is unimpaired.  Proteins play an important role in muscle contraction and coordination, they are present in the muscle tissues in the form of many microfilaments and provide muscle structure.  Muscle growth depends on the adequacy of proteins in the body.  Proteins function as building blocks for muscles, bones and cartilage, opt for a variety of whole foods to meet your protein needs including; grass fed meat and poultry, eggs, dairy, seeds, beans and nuts.

Protein contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         a growth in muscle mass

·         the maintenance of muscle mass

·         Protein is needed for normal growth and development of bone in children.

HIGH IN
Dietary Fibre
HIGH IN
Vitamin B1
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High in Vitamin B1

Also known as thiamin, vitamin B1 is one of the eight water soluble vitamins in the vitamin B family.  It is a vital human nutrient playing an important role in how we convert our food into energy – when we consume our food it is broken down into simpler units such as carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, vitamin B1 plays a crucial role in utilising these units to produce energy.  This is especially true for cells in the brain where the energy demand is really high which is why it is also referred to as a “morale vitamin” for its positive effect on the nervous system and a healthy mental attitude! 

Promoting the health of the nervous system, vitamin B1 helps in the proper development of the myelin sheaths around nerves, improving the body’s ability to withstand stress, it is often called the “anti-stress” vitamin and is also reported to improve the memory and powers of concentration.  Thiamin is essential to the body’s cardiac heath, involved in blood formation and helping in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is used to relay messages between the nerves and muscles to ensure proper cardiac function.  Brewer’s yeast and liver are the richest sources of vitamin B1, however, spirulina, linseeds, rye, wheat germ and kidney beans are also important sources of this vitamin.

Vitamin B1 contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal psychological function

·         the normal function of the heart

HIGH IN
Vitamin B6
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High in Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, plays an essential role in human life and is the most versatile of all the B vitamins!  Working closely with the other B vitamins, vitamin B6 contributes to numerous functions in the body.  It plays an important role in refurbishing the immune system to the required functional level, this potential health benefit appears to be associated with its role in the metabolism of the amino acid tryptophan.  Also referred to as the “mood vitamin”, B6 is needed for proper brain development and function, preventing mental fatigue and helping the body make the feel good hormones serotonin and norepinephrine that relax and lift your spirits, along with melatonin, the hormone which regulates the body clock. 

Vitamin B6 is functional in working with a number of enzymatic systems to make these enzymes work in the desired manner, this association contributes to the proper functioning of the nervous system.  It is also involved at several steps in the metabolism of carbohydrates, in particular the enzyme that pulls carbohydrates out of storage in the cell - in the form of a molecule called glycogen – which requires vitamin B6 for its activity and it metabolises a number of other nutrients to extract energy.  Vitamin B6 is a key factor in the manufacture of haemoglobin – the oxygen carrying component of red blood cells – and has a role in preventing heart disease.  Without enough B6 a compound called homocysteine builds up in the body which can damage blood vessel linings, setting the stage for plaque build-up when the body tries to heal the damage.  Vitamin B6 prevents this build-up thereby reducing the risk of heart attack.  The availability of this important vitamin is highest in foods like spirulina, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, green beans, walnuts and wheat germ.

Vitamin B6 contributes to:

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal homocysteine metabolism

·         normal protein and glycogen metabolism

·         normal psychological function

·         normal red blood cell formation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         the regulation of hormonal activity

·         normal cysteine synthesis

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Folate
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High in Folate

Folate – the naturally occurring vitamin B9 – is often confused with folic acid.  Folic acid is a synthetically derived molecule created in a German laboratory in the 1940s and does not occur naturally in food.  Needless to say, folate metabolizes faster in the body and any excess is excreted through the urine whereas folic acid can accumulate in the blood and may adversely affect immune cell function.  Nature knows best when it comes to nutrition!  Folate is probably the vitamin whose essential role in pregnancy is most widely known.  It is necessary for the production of new DNA which is needed for the production of new cells – the growing life within the womb engages in constant cell division and the mother must expand her blood supply with the production of new red blood cells – these activities demand a generous supply of folate. 

Folate works to convert the amino acid homocysteine into methionine - a deficiency allows homocysteine levels to accumulate in the body.  High levels of homocysteine are associated with heart disease and stroke and can block blood and other nutrients from reaching the brain, interfering with the production of the feel good hormones serotonin and dopamine which regulate mood.  Within the body, folate is an activator – it has an influence on “natural killer” cells of the immune system which are in charge of fighting infections and malignant cells.  Romaine lettuce, spinach and asparagus are especially high in folate; other good sources include egg yolks, legumes and lentils.

Folate contributes to:

  • maternal tissue growth during pregnancy
  • normal amino acid synthesis
  • normal blood formation
  • normal homocysteine metabolism
  • normal psychological function
  • the normal function of the immune system
  • the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
  • Folate has a role in the process of cell division
HIGH IN
Potassium
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High in Potassium

Potassium, the third most abundant mineral in the human body, is an essential mineral whose ions are vital for the functioning of all living cells!  Potassium plays a role at both the cellular and electrical level – considered and electrolyte because it carries a tiny electrical charge – it is found in red blood cells, muscles and bones.  Our bodies use potassium ions to conduct electrical impulses along muscle and nerve cells, it helps to boost the efficiency of nerve reflexes that transmit messages from one body part to another, this in turn helps in muscle contraction to perform various activities without tiring quickly. 

Potassium also has vasodilating properties that work to relieve the tension of blood vessels which is one of the main causes of high blood pressure.  It is helpful in reversing the role of sodium in unbalancing normal blood pressure thus acting as a vital component that maintains the normality of blood pressure in the human body.  The importance of potassium should not be underestimated in your dietary plan, most famously found in bananas other rich sources of potassium include spinach, avocados and coconut water.

Potassium contributes to:

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         the maintenance of normal blood pressure

HIGH IN
Phosphorus
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High in Phosphorus

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body.  In order to be properly utilised it must be in proper balance with calcium and magnesium in the blood, these are the two minerals it works in tandem with to create strong bones and teeth, also helping to lay the foundation of a strong skeletal structure.  It is an essential part of our diet - especially as children when the most bone growth and development occurs.  Both DNA and RNA contain phosphorus which make it important for cellular reproduction. 

Phosphorus also contributes to the repair process and maintenance of various body cells which suffer from daily wear and tear, it makes up part of the phospholipids that surround cells - phospholipids help to protect and regulate what goes in and out of each cell.  Phosphorus plays an essential role in how the body stores and uses energy, it aids in the process of energy extraction by stimulating the process of metabolism of different nutrients including niacin(B3) and riboflavin(B2), helping to maximise the uptake of these two vitamins in particular.  The best sources for this mineral are chlorella, dairy, whole grains, legumes and nuts.

Phosphorus contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         the normal growth and development of bone in children

·         the normal function of cell membranes

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

HIGH IN
Magnesium
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High in Magnesium

The importance of magnesium ions for all life itself, as well as for overall vibrant health, is hard to overstate.  Frequently referred to as the “miracle mineral”, magnesium is required to give the “spark of life” to metabolic functions involving the creation of energy and its transport, the creation and synthesis of proteins and is involved in literally hundreds of enzymatic reactions - it activates the enzymes that make copies of DNA and RNA making it essential in the process of cell division. 

Roughly half of your body’s magnesium is stored in your bones and acts as a cofactor with calcium and vitamin D to maintain and strengthen the bone structure and teeth (your teeth can only form hard enamel from calcium if magnesium is available).  It also works, again in concert with calcium, to regulate electrical impulses in the cells.  Cellular calcium channels allow the mineral to enter the cell only as long as needed to conduct an impulse, it is ushered out immediately by magnesium once its task is fulfilled, operating as a natural calcium channel blocker and responsible for relaxation, magnesium is pivotally important to the functioning of the parasympathetic nervous system.  Both magnesium and calcium are intimately involved with muscle function (magnesium relaxes, calcium contracts) with frequent muscle cramps being a symptom of a deficiency in magnesium.  If magnesium is severely deficient, the brain is particularly affected as magnesium is crucial to the production of neurotransmitters and the integrity of the blood brain barrier and therefore is needed to maintain normal psychological function.  The best food sources of magnesium include; avocados, chia and hemp seeds, sesame seeds, raw cacao and raw chocolate, sprouted nuts/seeds, sea vegetables (such as kelp and nori), raw green vegetables and grass fed dairy products.

Magnesium contributes to:

·         a reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         electrolyte balance

·         normal energy yielding metabolism

·         normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal muscle function

·         normal protein synthesis

·         normal psychological function

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal teeth

·         Magnesium has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Iron
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High in Iron

Iron is needed for a number of highly complex processes that continuously take place in the body on a molecular level and that are indispensable to human life.  Formation of haemoglobin is the chief function of this mineral – this is the primary protein found in red blood cells and represents about two thirds of the body’s iron.  Haemoglobin binds to the oxygen molecules that you breathe in from the air and releases them into your tissues.  The brain receives around 20% of the blood oxygen and a proper flow of blood to the brain can stimulate cognitive activity and help to create new neural pathways, it is especially important that children consume enough iron in their diet – iron deficiency in the first two years of a child’s life is associated with delayed cognitive and psychomotor development.  

Ribonucleic reductase is an iron dependant enzyme that is required for DNA synthesis (cell division), thus iron is required for a number of functions including healing and immune function - red blood cells are necessary for providing oxygen to damaged tissues, organs and cells.  Iron is also involved in food metabolism and is a cofactor and activator for some enzymes which play key roles in energy production and metabolism.  If iron stores are low symptoms can include tiredness, fatigue and dizziness.  Dietary iron has two forms, heme (animal based) and non-heme (plant based), important sources are; grass fed beef, oysters, spinach, lentils and beans.

Iron contributes to:

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         normal formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin

·         normal oxygen transport in the body

·         normal function of the immune system

·         the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

·         normal cognitive development of children

·         Iron has a role in the process of cell division

HIGH IN
Copper
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High in Copper

An essential trace mineral in the body, copper has long been known to play a role in human health – its use dates back to 400 BC when Hippocrates is said to have employed it as a treatment for a variety of disorders.  Playing a beneficial role in immune function, you need copper for healthy white blood cells – the cell type tasked with seeking out, identifying and destroying pathogens.  Low copper levels lower your white blood count leaving you vulnerable to infection. 

Copper is a vital element of the dark pigment melanin which imparts colouration to the hair and skin, intake of copper is said to protect greying hair.  Copper helps in the absorption of iron from the intestinal tract and releases it from its primary storage sites like the liver.  Also playing a significant role in the synthesis of haemoglobin, myelin and collagen, copper helps to protect the myelin sheath surrounding the nerves and is actively involved in the production of an element of connective tissue, elastin.  Functioning as a coenzyme for energy metabolism from the macronutrients in food we consume, copper enables a normal metabolic process in association with amino acids and vitamins.  Oxidative stress is a characteristic of copper deficiency, when obtained from dietary sources it acts as an antioxidant, getting rid of free radicals which can damage your cells and DNA.  For your body to use copper you need to have a balance of zinc and manganese which is why it is best to obtain your copper from dietary sources where it is already in bioavailable form.  Topping the chart as the best source of copper are oysters!  Closely followed by kale, shitake mushrooms, seeds, nuts and nut butters.

Copper Contributes to:

·         the maintenance of normal connective tissues

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the normal functioning of the nervous system

·         normal hair pigmentation

·         normal iron transport in the body

·         normal skin pigmentation

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

 

 

HIGH IN
Manganese
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High in Manganese

Derived from the Greek word for magic, manganese is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body and is found mostly in the bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas.  It is essential for the proper and normal growth of the human bone structure and is a very effective mineral in aiding in the increase of the mineral density of spinal bone.  Manganese is also needed in the production and repair of connective tissue, its specific role is in the manufacture of mucopolysaccharides which are one of the main components of all connective tissues.  

Regulation of the body’s metabolism is another vital function of manganese with manganese activated enzymes helping in the metabolism of cholesterol, amino acids and carbohydrates.  Also a powerful contributor to the protection of cells from oxidative stress, manganese is a component of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) which helps to fight free radicals.  Free radicals occur naturally in the body but can damage cell membranes and DNA, antioxidants such as SOD can help to neutralise free radicals.  Rich sources of manganese include; whole grains, nuts and nut butters and leafy vegetables.

Manganese contributes to:

·         normal energy-yielding metabolism

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the normal formation of connective tissue

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

SOURCE OF
Zinc
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Source of Zinc

Zinc is a metal that functions as an essential nutrient in the body, it is found in every cell and has been used since ancient times, with Ayurvedic texts dating as far back as the 14th century recommending its application in various forms.  Although only required in limited amounts, zinc supports important bodily processes like strengthening the immune system – your body needs zinc to make T-cells, a type of white blood cell that fights off foreign invaders in your bloodstream.  With antioxidant properties, zinc helps to protect the cells in the body from damage by free radicals and supports the catalytic activity of various enzymes essential in DNA synthesis and cell division.  In males, zinc assists in spermatogenesis (the production of mature spermatozoa) and is a critical mineral for robust testosterone levels, in females it aids in all the reproductive phases including the birth and lactation stages. 

Zinc is an essential component of over 300 enzymes participating in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins and other macronutrients and has a regulatory role in vitamin A transport mediated through protein synthesis.  The intake of zinc has a positive influence on bone mass, it is an important cofactor in the stimulation of bone building osteoblasts (cells that synthesize bone), it accelerates the renewal of skin cells and it is essential for healthy nails and shiny hair.  Zinc is vital for vision with high concentrations found in the retina and may also protect from night blindness and prevent the development of cataracts.  This super nutrient also plays a crucial role in memory formation and cognitive stability, ensuring a proper intake of zinc is an important step towards optimal brain function.  Topping the list of zinc rich foods are oysters, however seeds such as chia, sunflower, hemp and pumpkin are also rich sources of this important mineral.

Zinc contributes to:

·         normal DNA synthesis

·         normal acid-base metabolism

·         normal carbohydrate metabolism

·         normal cognitive function

·         normal fertility and reproduction

·         normal macronutrient metabolism

·         normal metabolism of fatty acids

·         normal metabolism of Vitamin A

·         normal protein synthesis

·         the maintenance of normal bones

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

SOURCE OF
Selenium
more info...
Source of Selenium

Selenium is an essential trace element that plays an important role in a number of physiological processes in humans.  It is a key element in spermatogenesis (the production or development of mature spermatozoa) and male fertility.  Selenium has also been shown to support the immune system by promoting the production of killer T-cells (a type of white blood cell), which engulf and destroy harmful foreign substances that enter the body and could otherwise cause disease and infection.  Selenium works in close conjunction with vitamin E as an antioxidant to prevent the formation of free radicals which can weaken and damage cells in every organ system. 

In addition, research has shown that selenium is an essential component of the thyroid gland’s functions, helping to regulate the amount of the thyroid hormone T3 that is produced within the body – without selenium the T3 hormone cannot be produced which can be catastrophic to a wide variety of your body’s systems.  It is believed that good selenium intake can help to prevent hair loss and promote shiny hair and healthy nail growthBrazil nuts are the richest source of selenium discovered so far, also found in mushrooms, shellfish, garlic, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, selenium is destroyed when foods are refined or processed so eating a variety of whole, unprocessed foods is the best way to get selenium into your diet.

Selenium contributes to:

·         normal spermatogenesis

·         the maintenance of normal hair

·         the maintenance of normal nails

·         the normal function of the immune system

·         normal thyroid function

·         the protection of cells from oxidative stress

Organic Chickpea Flour
Nutritional info
Per 100g
Serving 25g
Serving %RDA*
Daily Portion in grams
 
25
 
Energy KJ
1410KJ/335Kcal
353KJ/84Kcal
4.20%
Fat
7.4g
1.9g
2.64%
of which saturates
2.0g
0.5g
 
Carbohydrate
52.3g
13.1g
5.03%
of which sugars
4.3g
1.1g
1.19%
Protein
22.2g
5.6g
11.10%
Dietary Fibre
17.0g
4.3g
 
Salt
90.00mg
22.50mg
0.38%
Vitamin B1
0.50mg
0.13mg
11.36%
Vitamin B2
0.00mg
0.00mg
0.00%
Vitamin B6
0.50mg
0.13mg
8.93%
Folate
0.44mg
0.11mg
54.63%
Potassium
846.00mg
211.50mg
10.58%
Phosphorus
318.00mg
79.50mg
11.36%
Magnesium
166.00mg
41.50mg
11.07%
Iron
4.90mg
1.23mg
8.75%
Zinc
2.80mg
0.70mg
7.00%
Copper
0.90mg
0.23mg
22.50%
Manganese
1.60mg
0.40mg
20.00%
Selenium
0.01mg
0.00mg
3.77%
RDA: reference intake of an average adult

Our Organic Chickpea Flour is grown on certified organic land which is tested regularly. When the Chickpea pods are at peak maturity they are harvested for the peas inside. A very simple process then takes place whereby the Organic Chickpeas are thoroughly dried and milled into a fine powder. This powder is then tested and made ready for sale.

Organic Chickpea Flour

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5.0 / 5 (1)
3 months ago
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I am looking for alternatives to regular flour, and I really enjoy chickpea flour - in savoury recipes however. It's nice for savoury breakfast pancakes ('vegan omlette').

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